Progress on my Aeronautica Imperialis Grot Bommers

Was given some reinforcements for Aeronautica Imperialis, in the shape of some Grot Bommers as a present, which was nice.

Have made more progress on the models since my last blog post on them.

The main wings and engines are now complete. The engines were relatively easy to construct and fix to the main fuselage.

I have also added the tail section and the dorsal gunners. The dorsal gunners were a little fiddly.

They are nice big models which will look very imposing against the Imperial Navy.

See the full workbench feature on the Aeronautica Imperialis Grot Bommers.

Starting my Aeronautica Imperialis Grot Bommers

Was given some reinforcements for Aeronautica Imperialis, in the shape of some Grot Bommers as a present, which was nice.

The diminutive Gretchin have long been enthusiastic supporters of Ork aviation, whether gleefully pushing bombs out of open bays, crawling into tight spots to fix engines, or acting as spotters and even gunners on ork planes. It doesn’t take long before they become obsessed with flying just like their bigger kin, begging for their own turn on the control stick. Some enterprising Ork meks decided this arrangement could be mutually beneficial, and created guided missiles that could be flown like a tiny, gretchin-sized airplane. Fitted with a short-burn rocket engine and stuffed with unstable explosives, some rabid grots are happy to climb aboard just for the (short-lived) thrill of speed and freedom. They’re loaded into the wings of specially-fitted Grot Bommers, and launched in support of the Air Waaagh!

I did say in a post last year that these would be my next purchase for Aeronautica Imperialis would be these planes.

The obvious answer for me is a pair of Grot Bommerz. I do like the concept of these, though I am not a big fan of the actual models, but Orks is Orks, so they are next on my shopping list.

Here are the sprues, there are three (well two and a half) sprues in the box.

This sprue has the engines, the tails and the cockpits.

This sprue has the wings and the main fuselage.

The (half) sprue had the Grot Bombs.

I followed the instructions which are very clear and straightforward.

Lots of lovely detail for such tiny models.

I like the different engines and cockpits used, very Orky in appearance.

I will probably follow a similar process I used on my other Ork aircraft. Though I think yellow or orange might be the way to go as with these models that I saw at Warhammer World.

So now what’s next for Aeronautica Imperialis?

Back in July 2020 I wrote a speculative piece about future releases for Aeronautica Imperialis and some personal preferences for models. I had written the post after finishing painting my Valkyrie Assault Carriers which had been released alongside there Skies of Fire boxed set which contained miniatures for the Tau and the Astra Militarum.

I started to think about which models I would get next, and that got me thinking what we have seen that still needs to be released and also what could be released in the future and what I would like to see in the future as well.

Since that article was published we have had some new releases for Aeronautica Imperialis from GW and resin models from Forge World.

Forge World released the Vulture Gunship and the Arvus Lighter in August 2020.

Continue reading “So now what’s next for Aeronautica Imperialis?”

Reinforcements for Aeronautica Imperialis – Grot Bommers

Was given some reinforcements for Aeronautica Imperialis, in the shape of some Grot Bommers as a present, which was nice.

The diminutive Gretchin have long been enthusiastic supporters of Ork aviation, whether gleefully pushing bombs out of open bays, crawling into tight spots to fix engines, or acting as spotters and even gunners on ork planes. It doesn’t take long before they become obsessed with flying just like their bigger kin, begging for their own turn on the control stick. Some enterprising Ork meks decided this arrangement could be mutually beneficial, and created guided missiles that could be flown like a tiny, gretchin-sized airplane. Fitted with a short-burn rocket engine and stuffed with unstable explosives, some rabid grots are happy to climb aboard just for the (short-lived) thrill of speed and freedom. They’re loaded into the wings of specially-fitted Grot Bommers, and launched in support of the Air Waaagh!

I did say in a post last year that these would be my next purchase for Aeronautica Imperialis would be these planes.

The obvious answer for me is a pair of Grot Bommerz. I do like the concept of these, though I am not a big fan of the actual models, but Orks is Orks, so they are next on my shopping list.

They are currently still in the box, but I have started to think about what colour they might be painted. I will probably follow a similar process I used on my other Ork aircraft. Though I think yellow or orange might be the way to go as with these models that I saw at Warhammer World.

Retiring a few projects

I was doing some clearing out of the garage and realised that in a plastic bag (of all things) were some old Ork scenery projects that I had started over a decade ago, but never got around to finishing off.

I did some hard thinking and decided that if I hadn’t finished them by now I was never going to finish them, so I threw them out. I did think that if I wanted to do some scenery it might be easier to just start again.

So which projects have I retired?

Well the first was the Ork Defence Line which was based on some Imperial scenery pieces I had got at a Games Day. I had built some scenery at GamesDay and came home with the bits. These I then decided to take apart and re-build them as an Ork Defence Line.

Another project I retired was the Ork Desert Fuel Depot which was part of an Ork Cities of Death project. I did nearly finish one Ork Desert Fort, however that one I am keeping. Having liked that I started another fort, I took an old DVD-R spindle tub and covered it in plasticard and strips of wood, as well as spare parts from Rhino and Land Raider kits. 

The final project I retired was the Stompa Gantry which was based on a broken toy crane.

I think part of the reason this was never finished was I never finished painting the Stompa!

Well I can always start these ideas again if I want to in the future, in the meantime I must try and get some of my exisiting collection painted and finished.

They have arrived…

When Gorzag Gitstompa and Nikkit appeared on the Games Workshop webstore back in January I was tempted, and then remembered that these kinds of things sell out so I ordered it.

Gorzag Gitstompa and Nikkit

Dey say it’z da time of givin’ – well it’z da time of takin’ too, and dat’s just what Nikkit does best! Da Ammo Runt goes round makin’ sure dat ‘is boss, Gorzag Gitstompa, has everything he needs to break heads.

Grab these commemorative seasonal miniatures. Gorzag is based on a model that was available for Games Day 1998 that was itself based on the old box art for the classic game Gorkamorka. This glorious update reimagines the model in plastic and brings along a Grot Ammo Runt, Nikkit. These can be added to any Ork army as an Ork Nob and Ammo Runt, adding some individualisation to your collection.

This 8-piece plastic kit makes one Gorzag Gitstompa and one Nikkit. It is supplied with a 32mm Citadel round base and a 25mm Citadel round base.

It said it would take up to 120 days for delivery, so knew it would take some time to arrive and it arrived last week.

You get a nice box, which (probably) contains a single plastic sprue.

Gorzag Gitstompa and Nikkit

I haven’t actually opened it yet, still sealed.

Yes £21 for a model is quite expensive in my thinking, I still remember when I thought £1.95 for a single metal model was extortionate. However I have to remember it is 2021, I am no longer a teenager and the value of this shouldn’t be about how much (or how little) plastic is contained in the box. I was buying a modelling experience, not just a piece of plastic. Well that’s how I justify it to myself these days.

At some point I expect this to appear on the Ork workbench.

Warhammer World Grot Tanks

In the Ork display cabinets of Warhammer World are the Forge World Grot Tanks.

The lunatic product of the deranged imaginations of grot riggers and scavs that have spent far too long basking in the insane genius of the Big Meks, Grots Tanks are diminutive armoured vehicles made to imitate the far larger Ork Wagons and Tanks.

I really liked these models and I bought them when they were released, but alas they spent many years on the Grot Tank workbench before this year when I got some real painting done and virtually finished all four tanks.

I think the next time I visit Warhammer World I might pick up another pack of the tanks and build different variants and maybe add some more details as well.

See the Grot Tank Miniatures Gallery for more photographs of these little tanks.

 

Ork Battlewagon

There was this Battlewagon.

A Battlewagon is a catch-all term used for any type of Ork assault tank and heavy armoured troop transport.

Ork Battlewagon
Ork Battlewagon from display at Warhammer World

Here is another similar Battlewagon.

The term Battlewagon seems to refer overall to a category of large Ork armoured vehicles. A Battlewagon can be wheeled, tracked or a combination of the two and is used in many battlefield roles. It always carries a large complement of weapons.

See the Battlewagon Miniatures Gallery.

 

Gargantuan Squiggoth at Warhammer World

Gargantuan Squiggoths are monstrous creatures approximately the size of a small Imperial Titan. Their size is the result of their breeding using the special, high-quality feed formula of the Snakebites Clan. These giants are sometimes used as mounts by the most powerful of Ork Warbosses.

This Gargantuan Squiggoth was on display at Warhammer World.

Though I have had the smaller Squiggoth for many years I have always liked the bigger cousin. Don’t think I will get one though.

See the Gargantuan Squiggoth Miniatures Gallery.