Legions Imperialis: Rhino Transport

I have been thinking about getting some miniatures for Legions Imperialis since it was released. So was pleased to get the Legions Imperialis: Rhino Transport boxed set for Christmas.

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based upon ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels. Within the Space Marine Legions, the Deimos pattern was the most widespread, serving as the basic armoured transport available to the Legiones Astartes and the foundation on which a number of other war machines were based.

In the box you get two sprues that can be used to construct ten models.

This was the first time I had seen these models in the flesh. They are smaller than I thought they were going to be, but are (obviously) bigger than the older original Epic miniatures. However I thought they would be larger than they are.

I like how the box has come with transfers covering the many legions of Legions Imperialis.

When it comes to painting models, I do like to see how others have been painted. These are the images from Games Workshop.

I am thinking I will paint these as Imperial Fists.

The first stage will be constructing the models. Unlike the older Epic models, which were a single casting, these are multi-part kits.

 

Deimos Pattern Rhino in the desert

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

This is my Deimos Pattern Rhino in the desert.

Rhino getting in the way of the Typhon Heavy Siege Tank.

My other Deimos Pattern Rhino (note the two cupola bolters).

See the workbench feature on the first Deimos Pattern Rhino.

See the workbench feature on the second Deimos Pattern Rhino.

Deimos Pattern Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I was pleased to see one of the new Horus Heresy releases announced at Warhammer Fest was the Plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino. So when it was available for pre-order I clicked through and ordered the kit from my local FLGS.

Having finished painting them, I photographed them on my desert terrain board.

I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. This I painted in the same way as the first Rhino.

See the workbench feature on the first Deimos Pattern Rhino.

See the workbench feature on the second Deimos Pattern Rhino.

Headlighting the Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar. I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow. I also painted the bolter and exhausts with Leadbelcher. I then shaded the model. For the next stage I used some Citadel Layer Yriel Yellow. I took a large brush and gave the model, what I would call, a heavy drybrush. I then did some more drybrushing. I then fixed the tracks to the Rhino.

The next stage was adding some more details to the model, namely the headlights.

For the front headlights I used Citadel Layer Dorn Yellow. For the other lights in the headlights I used Citadel Base Mephiston Red.

I then did the protective grilles with an UNI black pen, rather than use paint on them.

I now need to add some more weathering.

I then do need to add some transfers.

Here is this Rhino with my first Deimos Pattern Rhino.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Rhino II.

Tracking the Deimos Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar. I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow. I also painted the bolter and exhausts with Leadbelcher. I then shaded the model. For the next stage I used some Citadel Layer Yriel Yellow. I took a large brush and gave the model, what I would call, a heavy drybrush. I then did some more drybrushing.

The next stage was to affix the tracks to the Rhino.

With the tracks for the Rhino I gave them a spray of Mechanicus Standard Grey, this was followed by a heavy drybrush of Gorthor Brown. The tracks, once dry, had a wash of Agrax Earthshade Shade. After painting and shading them, I drybrushed them lightly, first with Leadbelcher. I then did a very light drybrush with Terminatus Stone.

The tracks were removed from the sprue and using superglue they were attached to the Rhino.

You have to be careful when attaching these, as they are specific to each side of the Rhino, but they do attach to the Rhino quite easily.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Rhino II.

“Real” Ultramarines Rhino

I recently visited Warhammer World, my last visit was in January 2020.

The life sized Rhino was still there guarding the entrance.

THQ, who had commissioned the Rhino for their Dawn of War video game “gave” the Rhino to Games Workshop who then gave it a repaint in Ultramarines colours.

More photographs of the life sized Rhino.

Drybrushing the Deimos Pattern Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar. I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow. I also painted the bolter and exhausts with Leadbelcher. I then shaded the model. For the next stage I used some Citadel Layer Yriel Yellow. I took a large brush and gave the model, what I would call, a heavy drybrush.

I then added some more Citadel Layer Yriel Yellow to the model.

I then gave the model a lighter drybrush of Citadel Layer Dorn Yellow.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Rhino II.

Painting the Deimos Pattern Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar. I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow. I also painted the bolter and exhausts with Leadbelcher. I then shaded the model.

For the next stage I used some Citadel Layer Yriel Yellow. I took a large brush and gave the model, what I would call, a heavy drybrush. I put paint on the brush, and then used some kitchen towel to remove most of the paint, and then using a heavy stippling process added paint to the model.

The plan was that this would take the flat surfaces of the model back to a flatter base colour.

Some of the areas where the shade pooled will probably need some more work.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Rhino II.

Shading the Deimos Pattern Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar. I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow. I also painted the bolter and exhausts with Leadbelcher.

It was then onto shading the model. I am using the same process I used with my other Deimos Pattern Rhino. I used some Citadel Reikland Fleshshade Shade.

I did a heavier wash than the previous Rhino.

This did mean the Shade pooled in certain areas. I am hoping that this will be covered up when I do the deeper drybrushing next.

I also shaded the tracks, this I did with Agrax Earthshade Shade. Once this was dry I drybrushed them with some Leadbelcher.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Rhino II.

Detailing the Deimos Pattern Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar. I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow.

I  painted the cupola bolter, and the exhausts, with Leadbelcher.

Deimos Pattern Rhino

This Rhino has a single cupola bolter, with my first Deimos Pattern Rhino I gave it two cupola bolters. The rear view of the Rhino.

Deimos Pattern Rhino

I did a heavy drybrush of the tracks with Gorthor Brown, having initially given them a basecoat of a spray of Mechanicus Standard Grey.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Rhino II.