Sharke of the Rifles

Flintloque, a game of Fantasy Napoleonics is published by Alternative Armies. The game pits “British” Orcs against “French” Elves. Other fantasy races make up the other major “European” powers during the Napoleonic Wars.

Sharke is an officer in the Rifles.

Orc models are from Alternative Armies. The buildings are resin castings from Steve Barber models.

Flintloque Orc Miniatures Gallery

Flintloque Orc Rifles

Flintloque, a game of Fantasy Napoleonics is published by Alternative Armies. The game pits “British” Orcs against “French” Elves. Other fantasy races make up the other major “European” powers during the Napoleonic Wars.

Flintloque Orc Rifles enter a village to see if there are any Elves hiding in the shadows.

Orc models are from Alternative Armies. The buildings are resin castings from Steve Barber models.

Flintloque Orc Miniatures Gallery

Rescan please

This site (in various incarnations) is over twenty five years old. I first started posting images to the web in 1997.

Back in the 1990s I took various photographs of my miniatures, using a film 35mm camera, I then developed the film, before scanning the photos in. Later I was able to have the images scanned by the developer onto CD-ROM

Due to bandwidth limits, back in the 1990s most people had dial up modems, so when scanning images and editing them for the web, I kept the size small, both in terms of file size and pixels.

However now, not only do we have faster connections, fibre, 4G and 5G, websites such as this (using word processing) can dynamically and responsively change the size of the image to meet the needs of the different kinds of browsers people are using.

As a result I have decided to start re-scanning images into the website and blog. I will be posting the new images to the blog, and I will be updating the relevant gallery pages as well.

Cerberus Heavy Tank Destroyer

Revealed at the Las Vegas Open was the all new plastic Cerberus Heavy Tank Destroyer.

The Cerberus Heavy Tank Destroyer has one job – blowing up other tanks. To that end, it is armed with a centreline-mounted neutron laser battery, a relic of the dark age of technology that dooms its crew to a horrid death thanks to the exotic radiation it pumps out – but not before it dooms dozens of enemy vehicles to a much more immediate death.

We first saw this as a resin Forge World model in 2012.

I have to say I am not a fan of this vehicle. Apart from the fact that it dooms its crew to a horrid death; I am not a fan of the weapon mount. I much prefer the cannon on the Typhon tank. I think it is, because it looks like it is missing a mantle for the main weapon.

A gun mantlet is an armour plate or shield attached to an armoured fighting vehicle’s gun, protecting the opening through which the weapon’s barrel projects from the hull or turret armour and, in many cases, ensuring the vulnerable warhead of a loaded shell does not protrude past the vehicle’s armour.

I think that is similar to the reasons why I am not a fan of the Ork Kill Blasta as well.

Plastic Space Marine Jetbikes swooping in soon

Scimitar Pattern Space Marine Legion Jetbike

The Scimitar Jetbikes of the Age of Darkness are modifications of complex pre-Imperium designs. Essentially compact aircraft with the addition of grav-impellors, they rush your Space Marines into combat at great speed. And soon you’ll be able to add them to your army in plastic.

There will be plastic Scimitar Pattern Space Marine Legion Jetbikes for The Horus Heresy game.

Forge World released resin Scimitar Pattern Jetbikes in 2012 and these new plastic ones are very similar (if not nearly identical) to those.

Back in 2012 I said

They do look interesting models, but I am not sure if I like them. They seem more like space ship models than bikes.

Now over ten years later I think I may have changed my mind, but they still look quite clunky.

What do you think?

The Old World

Warhammer

It’s on it’s way, but still looks like we will need to wait a while!

The Warhammer Community website gave us another insight into the development of Warhammer: The Old World.

The first mention of this game was in 2019, so we are approaching four years of development, and we’ve not seen a single miniature in all that time.

Though it would appear that the development team have spent hours doing research and playtesting the new game.

Our goal was to create a game that captures the best elements of all the editions of Warhammer Fantasy Battle, but at the same time providing new and exciting rules,  and fresh challenges to overcome. 

We are getting a lot of background information, the setting won’t be the world we remember from Warhammer Fantasy of the past, but a time before then.

I am looking forward to seeing where this is going and what the final game will look like. Hopefully we might see some miniatures soon.

Desert Storm 1959

Today saw the announcement of the 2023 Airfix range. I generally don’t do model kits, well I haven’t made an Airfix style model kit since the 1980s… though I have built a fair few wargaming kits since then.

I still have a nostalgic fondness for some of the older Airfix kits so was pleased to see that Airfix have announced the re-release of the Fairey Rotodyne.

Airfix Fairey Rotodyne

The Fairey Rotodyne was a 1950s British compound gyroplane designed and built by Fairey Aviation and intended for commercial and military uses. The Rotodyne featured a tip-jet-powered rotor that burned a mixture of fuel and compressed air bled from two wing-mounted turboprops. The rotor was driven for vertical takeoffs, landings and hovering, as well as low-speed translational flight, but autorotated during cruise flight with all engine power applied to two propellers.

Fairey Rotodyne
Johannes Thinesen, CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons

Due to army and Royal Air Force (RAF) interest, development of the Rotodyne had been funded out of the defence budget for a time. The RAF also placed an order for 12 military transport versions. According to rumours, the U.S. Army was also interested in buying around 200 Rotodynes.

One prototype was built. Although the Rotodyne was promising in concept and successful in trials, the programme was eventually cancelled. The termination has been attributed to the type failing to attract any commercial orders; this was in part due to concerns over the high levels of rotor tip jet noise generated in flight. 

The re-release of the Fairey Rotodyne reminded me of an idea I had for an alternative history background for gaming. The basic premise was a Desert Storm background but with 1950s tanks, aircraft, helicopters and VTOL craft like the Fairey Rotodyne.

The British forces alongside Westland Whirlwinds and Westland Wessex helicopters would also have access to the Fairey Rotodyne for transport and troop insertion. I even thought about including the Bristol Belvedere, which though entered service in 1961, had its first flight in 1958.

Airfix have also announced they are re-releasing the Bristol Bloodhound SAM missile.

Bristol Bloodhound

It was developed in the 1950s and was used for air defence until 1991 in the UK.

Alongside the aircraft and missiles I would have also added some Centurion tanks and other armoured vehicles.

I would have painted the models in a desert camouflage similar to the US Desert Battle Dress Uniform (DBDU).

Desert Battle Dress Uniform
The original uploader was Pretzelpaws at English Wikipedia., CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Two shades of brown with those clusters of black and white spots.

As for opponents? Well that would have been Soviet aircraft and vehicles, also in a desert camouflage.

Airfix have said they will release these new models in the Autumn of 2023, so it may be a possibility, just maybe.

Also painting it yellow

The Predator is perhaps the best known and most widespread variant of the basic Rhino chassis. Augmented with superior armour and firepower, it entirely sacrifices the Rhino’s troop transport capacity in favour of ammunition and generators for its formidable weapon systems. 

Having got this kit for Christmas, I started putting the model together. For painting I kept the sponsons separate and I can easily remove the turret as well. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar.

As with my first Deimos Pattern Rhino I am painting it yellow. I had intended to spray the underneath of the model with Citadel Zandri Dust in preparation for painting the the whole model yellow. However I ran out of paint…

So this model was just given a coat of yellow paint. Games Workshop don’t do a yellow spray and I don’t have an airbrush. I did use a paint comparison site to find a close alternative to Yriel Yellow. The Daemonic Yellow spray from Army Painter seemed like a good choice, and my local FLGS had one in stock, which I bought in the summer.

I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow.

The sponsons I kept seperate and sprayed them with Citadel Leadbelcher.

I did the same for the Deimos Pattern Rhino and then that can of paint gave up the ghost.  Luckily there was enough to paint the Predator and the Rhino.

For the tracks, still on the sprue, I gave them a spray of Citadel Mechanicus Standard Grey.

The next stage will doing the detailing, the exhausts and the weapons.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Predator Battle Tank.

Painting it yellow

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately. I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar.

As with my first Deimos-pattern Rhino I am painting it yellow.

I had intended to spray the underneath of the model with Citadel Zandri Dust in preparation for painting the the whole model yellow. However I ran out of paint…

So this model was just given a coat of yellow paint. Games Workshop don’t do a yellow spray and I don’t have an airbrush. I did use a paint comparison site to find a close alternative to Yriel Yellow. The Daemonic Yellow spray from Army Painter seemed like a good choice, and my local FLGS had one in stock, which I bought in the summer.

I gave the model a couple of light coats of Daemonic Yellow.

I did the same for the Deimos Pattern Predator and then that can of paint gave up the ghost.  Luckily there was enough to paint the Rhino.

For the tracks, still on the sprue, I gave them a spray of Citadel Mechanicus Standard Grey.

The next stage will doing the detailing, the exhausts and the hatch bolter.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos Pattern Rhino II.

 

Undercoating another Plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino

The Rhino is the most widely used armoured personnel carrier in the Imperium. Based on ancient STC technology, the fundamental design is robust, reliable, and easy to maintain, with an adaptive power plant that can run off a wide variety of fuels.

I bought the plastic Deimos Pattern Rhino when it came out in the summer, you can see the workbench for that Rhino here.  I was lucky enough to get a second Rhino for a Christmas present. The model has many more parts and is a more detailed kit than the original plastic Rhino kit that came out in the 1980s. I constructed the model to the instructions, though I left the tracks off to paint separately.

I gave the model an undercoat of Citadel White Scar.

I think if I was to get a third model, I might get the Forge World doors to go with it. I also like the idea of making it campaign weary with stowage and some battle damage. Another idea I had was to do an ACAV version similar to the M113 ACAV which was used in Vietnam.

See the workbench feature on the Deimos-pattern Rhino II.