Progress on my Aeronautica Imperialis Grot Bommers

Was given some reinforcements for Aeronautica Imperialis, in the shape of some Grot Bommers as a present, which was nice.

Have made more progress on the models since my last blog post on them.

The main wings and engines are now complete. The engines were relatively easy to construct and fix to the main fuselage.

I have also added the tail section and the dorsal gunners. The dorsal gunners were a little fiddly.

They are nice big models which will look very imposing against the Imperial Navy.

See the full workbench feature on the Aeronautica Imperialis Grot Bommers.

Pre-production Concorde G-AXDN

Concorde G-AXDN forms part of the Duxford Aviation Society British Airliner Collection and is proudly on display in the Airspace hangar at IWM Duxford.

The British and French pre-production aircraft had several changes in design compared to the earlier prototype Concordes. These consist of a lengthened fuselage, smaller passenger cabin windows, a new glazed visor design and the aircraft were fitted with the Olympus 593-4 engines. The pre-production aircraft were used to further develop the design of the final production aircraft.

Other changes to the design included a different wing plan form that of the prototypes, a larger fuel capacity, and different air intake systems. Both the two pre-production Concordes differed in size and design from each other, the French one which built last, being close to the final production design.

G-AXDN flew faster than any other Concorde! She flew higher and faster than any other Concorde history.

Starting my Aeronautica Imperialis Grot Bommers

Was given some reinforcements for Aeronautica Imperialis, in the shape of some Grot Bommers as a present, which was nice.

The diminutive Gretchin have long been enthusiastic supporters of Ork aviation, whether gleefully pushing bombs out of open bays, crawling into tight spots to fix engines, or acting as spotters and even gunners on ork planes. It doesn’t take long before they become obsessed with flying just like their bigger kin, begging for their own turn on the control stick. Some enterprising Ork meks decided this arrangement could be mutually beneficial, and created guided missiles that could be flown like a tiny, gretchin-sized airplane. Fitted with a short-burn rocket engine and stuffed with unstable explosives, some rabid grots are happy to climb aboard just for the (short-lived) thrill of speed and freedom. They’re loaded into the wings of specially-fitted Grot Bommers, and launched in support of the Air Waaagh!

I did say in a post last year that these would be my next purchase for Aeronautica Imperialis would be these planes.

The obvious answer for me is a pair of Grot Bommerz. I do like the concept of these, though I am not a big fan of the actual models, but Orks is Orks, so they are next on my shopping list.

Here are the sprues, there are three (well two and a half) sprues in the box.

This sprue has the engines, the tails and the cockpits.

This sprue has the wings and the main fuselage.

The (half) sprue had the Grot Bombs.

I followed the instructions which are very clear and straightforward.

Lots of lovely detail for such tiny models.

I like the different engines and cockpits used, very Orky in appearance.

I will probably follow a similar process I used on my other Ork aircraft. Though I think yellow or orange might be the way to go as with these models that I saw at Warhammer World.

Lockheed Hercules C130K Mk3

First flown as a prototype for the United States Air Force in August 1954, the C-130 Hercules, as a troop transport, disaster relief and aerial tanker aircraft has been a mainstay of the RAF transport fleet since the late 1960s (along with those of many other air forces); it has seen extensive operational use including the Falklands, Iraq and Afghanistan.

The example at RAF Museum Cosford was the last RAF C130K Mk.3 to be retired.

This Hercules C3 XV202 served with the Royal Air Force from 1967 to 2011.

I’ve always liked the concept of gaming scenarios which include the C-130 Hercules, probably down to the Raid on Entebbe, which of course has been the subject of many films.

There are plenty of 1/72 model kits of the Hercules, but for 15mm or 28mm games there is less or no choice.

Belicosa Volcano Cannon

Saw this on the Warhammer Community site, Forge World are going to release a massive Belicosa Volcano Cannon for the Warbringer Nemesis Titan.

Belicosa Volcano Cannon

The massive Warbringer Nemesis Titan is set to receive one of the most powerful weapons found outside a starship: the mighty Belicosa Volcano Cannon. This resin kit from Forge World is designed to fit perfectly with the plastic Warbringer Nemesis Titan. 

Think I might pause making my Warbringer Nemesis Titan and see if I can get hold of the Belicosa Volcano Cannon.

Fairchild F-24 Argus

The four-seat Fairchild F24, sporting and training aeroplane, made its first flight in 1932. The design attracted attention from the civilian American market and improved models soon began to appear. With the appearance of the F24W series, the aircraft’s potential as a light military transport was recognised by the United States Army. An initial contract for 161 aircraft for the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) was placed in 1941. However, all the aircraft were re-allocated to the Royal Air Force under the American Lend-Lease Act which allowed war materials ordered for the United States armed forces to be given to other nations for the duration of the war.

Fairchild F-24 Argus - RAF Cosford Museum

Further contracts led to the delivery of more than 600 aircraft to the United Kingdom. Known in the USAAF as the Forwarder, those arriving in Great Britain were given the official name Argus.

The Argus was used in the light communications role by the RAF and found a particular niche ferrying pilots of the Air Transport Auxiliary.

The Museum’s aircraft was used during the war as a hack for the US 8th Air Force. After purchase from private owners in 1973, it spent many years in deep storage, before restoration for the Museum by the Medway Aircraft Preservation Society in 1999.

So now what’s next for Aeronautica Imperialis?

Back in July 2020 I wrote a speculative piece about future releases for Aeronautica Imperialis and some personal preferences for models. I had written the post after finishing painting my Valkyrie Assault Carriers which had been released alongside there Skies of Fire boxed set which contained miniatures for the Tau and the Astra Militarum.

I started to think about which models I would get next, and that got me thinking what we have seen that still needs to be released and also what could be released in the future and what I would like to see in the future as well.

Since that article was published we have had some new releases for Aeronautica Imperialis from GW and resin models from Forge World.

Forge World released the Vulture Gunship and the Arvus Lighter in August 2020.

Continue reading “So now what’s next for Aeronautica Imperialis?”

Nice new flyers for Aeronautica Imperialis

Well as part of Warhammer Fest Online we saw the announcement of a new boxed set for Aeronautica Imperialis.

There is a new Aeronautica Imperialis boxed set – Wrath of Angels. After Wings of Vengeance, featuring Orks and the Imperial Navy, and Skies of Fire, which introduced the T’au Air Caste, this set is all about Aeldari Craftworlds versus Space Marines.

So in the boxed set you get three Xiphon Interceptors, two chunky Storm Eagles for the Space Marines, whilst for the Eldar, sorry Aeldari, you get three Nightwings and three Phoenix Bombers.

Quite like the chunky Storm Eagles which look the part.

I am not a real fan of the Xiphon Interceptors. but these are nice models, they seem to work better in the smaller size.

Available separately will be a lovely looking plastic Space Marine Thunderhawk.

Lots of great detail and does make you think could GW move into recreating Epic sized vehicles and infantry for Adeptus Titanicus?

I do like all the Space Marine models and think these will make for interesting games of Aeronautica Imperialis. I also quite like the Aeldari models so I think I might get the boxed set.

Armstrong Whitworth AW.660 Argosy

This Armstrong Whitworth Argosy was on display at RAF Cosford having been flown there on its last flight in May 1975.

The Armstrong Whitworth Argosy was a British post-war transport/cargo aircraft; it was the final aircraft to be designed and produced by aviation company Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft.

Although given different internal design numbers, the AW.650 civil and AW.660 military models were, for most practical purposes, the same design, while both models also shared the “Argosy” name.