Soviet D-30 122mm Towed Howitzer

Outside the Land Warfare exhibit at the Imperial War Museum Duxford is a Soviet D-30 122mm Towed Howitzer.

Soviet D-30 122mm Towed Howitzer

The Soviet D-30 is a Soviet howitzer that first entered service in 1960 and it was adopted by other Warsaw Pact nations. . It is a robust piece that focuses on the essential features of a towed field gun suitable for all conditions. The D-30 has a maximum range of 15.4 kilometers, or over 21 km using RAP ammunition.

This example served with the Volksarmee of the DDR and was assimilated into the equipment of the German army on reunification.

Armoured Press Land Rover

A few years ago I visited the Imperial War Museum in London.

One of the exhibits is a armoured press and TV Land Rover on display which has certainly had a rough time.

Armoured Press Land Rover

You can imagine making one of these to be an objective for a game where a group of journalists and their camera crew have been stopped and held by bandits and a rescue mission is undertaken to free them.

Ork Fighter Bommerz

These Ork Fighter Bommerz were on display at Warhammer World in Nottingham.

The Fighta-Bommer is the Orks’ primary tactical and strategic bombing aircraft. The Fighta-Bommer is capable of both void and atmospheric flight. It is used to bomb enemy bases and to assault enemy starships, or even in some cases to dogfight with enemy aircraft.

Ork Fighter Bommerz

Constructed with typical Orkish crudeness, these rickety, gravity-defying contraptions are often surprisingly effective and dangerous to friend and foe alike, as is common with most Ork technology. Fighta-Bommerz are often deployed as air support during large Ork planetary invasions, or to serve as point defence for Ork starships.

Ork Fighter Bommerz

Fighta-Bommerz are created by the few Meks who are interested in aircraft. As with all Ork vehicles, Fighta-Bommerz are kit-bashed affairs that usually defy the laws of aerodynamics, and fly despite their ungainly, brutish construction.

Ork Fighter Bommerz

Workbench feature on my plastic Ork Bommer.

Workbench feature on my Forge World Ork Bommer.

More photographs of Ork Bommerz.

Great War APC

The Mark IX tank was a British armoured fighting vehicle from the First World War. It was the world’s first specialised armoured personnel carrier (APC).

IMG_2896

During the first actions with tanks, it became clear that infantry often could not keep up with the tanks, It wasn’t that the soldiers were too slow, the early tanks themselves could only move at a walking pace, but because soldiers on foot remained vulnerable to enemy machine gun fire. In many actions, positions gained at great cost were immediately lost for lack of infantry to consolidate.

At the end of the Great War only three had been finished, out of a total ultimate production run of thirty-four, following an order for two hundred.

These metal monsters designed in an era when they didn’t really know what they were doing and there was a lot of trial and error. The Mark IX reminds us that the APC is as old as the tank.

Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier)

Outside the Land Warfare exhibit at the Imperial War Museum Duxford is an Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier).

This British tracked armoured personnel carrier has a crew of 2 with capacity for 10 personnel, powered by Rolls-Royce 6-cylinder multi-fuel engine, armed with one machine gun.

Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier)

The FV432 is the armoured personnel carrier variant of the British Army’s FV430 series of armoured fighting vehicles. Since its introduction in the 1960s, it has been the most common variant, being used for transporting infantry on the battlefield. In the 1980s, almost 2,500 vehicles were in use, with around 1,500 remaining in operation – mostly in supporting arms rather than front-line infantry service.

Although the FV432 Series was to have been phased out of service in favour of newer vehicles, such as the Warrior and the CVR(T) series, 500 have been upgraded to extend their service into the next decade.[1]

Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier)

This particular FV432 entered service December 1964 with the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders BAOR.