Bristol Bulldog MkIIA

The Bristol Bulldog is a British Royal Air Force single-seat biplane fighter designed during the 1920s by the Bristol Aeroplane Company. 

More than 400 Bulldogs were were built at Bristols’ Filton factory for the RAF and overseas customers, and it was one of the most famous aircraft used by the RAF during the inter-war period.

G-ABBB – Bulldog IIA on static display at the Royal Air Force Museum London in London. This aircraft was the civilian demonstrator and is painted as K2227. It was severely damaged in a crash in 1964 at the Farnborough Airshow and repaired in the late 1990s.

Washing the Bolt Action Home Guard Mark IV Tank

I am in the process of building a Bolt Action 28mm Home Guard force, I did want to add some armour to them with a Mark IV Male World War One tank put into service, even if it was merely as a mobile pillbox.

The Bovington Tank Museum has on display a Mark IV Male tank that was used just in this way. It was used in World War One and then presented to the Navy. When war broke out in September 1939, the Tank Mark IV (Male) number 2324 was refurbished for Home Guard duties.

Having constructed and undercoated the Mark IV Tank the next stage was a base coat of Army Green Spray from the Army Painter range. I then used a Humbrol Tank Grey 67 spray for the dark colour camouflage pattern. For the tracks I used Citadel Gorthor Brown.

I then gave the model a wash using Citadel Seraphim Sepia Shade.

I did one side at a time to try and stop the shade pooling too much.

I am aiming to use some more shades across various parts of the model.

Hawker Typhoon

The Hawker Typhoon is a British single-seat fighter-bomber, produced by Hawker Aircraft. It was intended to be a medium-high altitude interceptor, as a replacement for the Hawker Hurricane but several design problems were encountered and it never completely satisfied this requirement.

The Typhoon became established in roles such as night-time intruder and long-range fighter.

From late 1942 the Typhoon was equipped with bombs and from late 1943 RP-3 rockets were added to its armoury. With those weapons and its four 20mm Hispano autocannons, the Typhoon became one of the Second World War’s most successful ground-attack aircraft.

Only one complete Hawker Typhoon still survives: serial number MN235. After just forty minutes flight time, it was shipped to Ohio for evaluation by the United States Army Air Force.

Originally on display at the National Air and Space Museum (part of the Smithsonian Institution) in the United States, it was presented to the RAF Museum in Hendon, North London in commemoration of the RAF’s 50th Anniversary in exchange for a Hawker Hurricane.

Converting some ruins

Having picked up the Ruined Factorum sprue that came with Warhammer 40000 Imperium 31 a couple of weeks back, I set myself a reminder, to purchase issue 34 for the second sprue .

The ruins are from the The Battlezone: Manufactorum – Sub-cloister and Storage Fane kit which did cost £37.50 at Games Workshop and contains two similar sprues. So at £8.99 you would be making a saving of £9.76. However you can’t buy the kit anymore anyhow.

This time, as before, you get two more corner ruins, all coming on a single sprue.  I did manage to pick up a second magazine and decided that I would convert them. It was a relatively simple conversion swapping over the corners. With the larger sides I needed to cut them down.

This was quite hard as the plastic is very thick. I use a combination of cutters and a craft knife.

I also cut some of the window frames as well.

This is the other converted ruin.

You can see how I cut the corner down by comparing the above photograph with this one of the unconverted ruin.

I had to cut up the flooring. This was done by scoring along the lines on the flooring with a craft knife.

The next stage will be a white undercoat.

North American Harvard IIB

The North American Harvard IIB (or North American Aviation T-6 Texan) is an American single-engined advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), United States Navy, Royal Air Force, Royal Canadian Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1970s.

Some more ruins

Having picked up the Ruined Factorum sprue that came with Warhammer 40000 Imperium 31 a couple of weeks back, I also purchased issue 34 for the second sprue .

The ruins are from the The Battlezone: Manufactorum – Sub-cloister and Storage Fane kit which did cost £37.50 at Games Workshop and contains two similar sprues. So at £8.99 you would be making a saving of £9.76. However you can’t buy that kit anymore anyhow.

This time, as before, you get two more corner ruins, all coming on a single sprue. They go together really easily. There are two corners, whereas with the other sprue you got a large corner and a smaller corner. This one is similar, but the smaller ruined corner is larger and the larger corner is smaller (if that makes sense).

This is the smaller corner and is constructed from two parts.

This is the larger corner, which has a floor. It has four parts. The first stage is to affix the skull Cog Mechanicum symbol to the round hole in the wall.

Then glue the two walls together, letting it dry before adding the floor.

The next stage will be a white undercoat.

de Havilland Chipmunk

One of the RAF’s longest serving aircraft types, the Canadian designed Chipmunk entered RAF service in 1950. Chipmunks replaced the Tiger Moth as an initial pilot trainer, offering relatively modern features such as flaps, brakes, radio and an enclosed cockpit.

They also equipped the RAF’s University Air Squadrons until 1973. Although the type was retired from flying training in 1993, Chipmunks continued to serve with the RAF’s Air Experience Flights until 1996, with which many thousands of Air Training Corps and Combined Cadet Force cadets have had their first taste of flight. Over seven-hundred Chipmunks were built for the RAF, some of which also served with the Army and the Royal Navy. A substantial number of civilian Chipmunks are still flying in countries around the world.

There was a de Havilland Chipmunk at RAF Cosford.

Washing the Adeptus Titanicus Manufactorum Imperialis

I have had the Manufactorum Imperialis box on my wishlist for a while now. So was pleased to receive the box recently as a present.

The Manufactorum Imperialis box allows you build terrain and scenery for your Adeptus Titanicus battle. I used one large and one small sprue in the first instance to construct the models. I then gave the models an undercoat and then a basecoat.

The next stage was to wash the models using a Shade. For the crane I used Citadel Seraphim Sepia Shade.

For the containers and other silos, I also used Citadel Seraphim Sepia Shade.

For these models I used Citadel Nuln Oil Shade and Citadel Seraphim Sepia Shade.

For these models I used Citadel Nuln Oil Shade.

Spitfire F24

The Spitfire F24 was the ultimate development of the type, but the advent of the jet fighter meant that only small numbers were built and even fewer went into Royal Air Force service.

The last major production Spitfire was the F22. The F24 differed only in the smallest of details and in fact some F24s were converted from F22 airframes. Only seventy F24s were completed and most went into store although No.80 Squadron was fully equipped with the type.

These ultimate examples of the Spitfire incorporated all the modifications and improvements developed on earlier marks. The F24s had a tear-drop canopy for greater visibility and enlarged tail surfaces for better control. Like many of the later marks the F24 was fitted with the more powerful Griffon engine which provided a 160kph (100mph) greater top speed than the early Spitfires and almost twice the rate of climb. The weight of firepower from its cannon had tripled over the types’ original fit of eight machineguns. It is perhaps a mark of the propaganda value of the Spitfire name that this very different machine was not re-named.

Tracking the Bolt Action Home Guard Mark IV Tank

I am in the process of building a Bolt Action 28mm Home Guard force, I did want to add some armour to them with a Mark IV Male World War One tank put into service, even if it was merely as a mobile pillbox.

The Bovington Tank Museum has on display a Mark IV Male tank that was used just in this way. It was used in World War One and then presented to the Navy. When war broke out in September 1939, the Tank Mark IV (Male) number 2324 was refurbished for Home Guard duties.

Having constructed and undercoated the Mark IV Tank the next stage was a base coat of Army Green Spray from the Army Painter range. I then used a Humbrol Tank Grey 67 spray for the dark colour camouflage pattern.

For the tracks I used Citadel Gorthor Brown.

The blu-tak I used for the masking took a bit of the paint off.

Next step will be a wash.