Some more ruins

Having picked up the Ruined Factorum sprue that came with Warhammer 40000 Imperium 31 a couple of weeks back, I also purchased issue 34 for the second sprue .

The ruins are from the The Battlezone: Manufactorum – Sub-cloister and Storage Fane kit which did cost £37.50 at Games Workshop and contains two similar sprues. So at £8.99 you would be making a saving of £9.76. However you can’t buy that kit anymore anyhow.

This time, as before, you get two more corner ruins, all coming on a single sprue. They go together really easily. There are two corners, whereas with the other sprue you got a large corner and a smaller corner. This one is similar, but the smaller ruined corner is larger and the larger corner is smaller (if that makes sense).

This is the smaller corner and is constructed from two parts.

This is the larger corner, which has a floor. It has four parts. The first stage is to affix the skull Cog Mechanicum symbol to the round hole in the wall.

Then glue the two walls together, letting it dry before adding the floor.

The next stage will be a white undercoat.

de Havilland Chipmunk

One of the RAF’s longest serving aircraft types, the Canadian designed Chipmunk entered RAF service in 1950. Chipmunks replaced the Tiger Moth as an initial pilot trainer, offering relatively modern features such as flaps, brakes, radio and an enclosed cockpit.

They also equipped the RAF’s University Air Squadrons until 1973. Although the type was retired from flying training in 1993, Chipmunks continued to serve with the RAF’s Air Experience Flights until 1996, with which many thousands of Air Training Corps and Combined Cadet Force cadets have had their first taste of flight. Over seven-hundred Chipmunks were built for the RAF, some of which also served with the Army and the Royal Navy. A substantial number of civilian Chipmunks are still flying in countries around the world.

There was a de Havilland Chipmunk at RAF Cosford.

Washing the Adeptus Titanicus Manufactorum Imperialis

I have had the Manufactorum Imperialis box on my wishlist for a while now. So was pleased to receive the box recently as a present.

The Manufactorum Imperialis box allows you build terrain and scenery for your Adeptus Titanicus battle. I used one large and one small sprue in the first instance to construct the models. I then gave the models an undercoat and then a basecoat.

The next stage was to wash the models using a Shade. For the crane I used Citadel Seraphim Sepia Shade.

For the containers and other silos, I also used Citadel Seraphim Sepia Shade.

For these models I used Citadel Nuln Oil Shade and Citadel Seraphim Sepia Shade.

For these models I used Citadel Nuln Oil Shade.

Spitfire F24

The Spitfire F24 was the ultimate development of the type, but the advent of the jet fighter meant that only small numbers were built and even fewer went into Royal Air Force service.

The last major production Spitfire was the F22. The F24 differed only in the smallest of details and in fact some F24s were converted from F22 airframes. Only seventy F24s were completed and most went into store although No.80 Squadron was fully equipped with the type.

These ultimate examples of the Spitfire incorporated all the modifications and improvements developed on earlier marks. The F24s had a tear-drop canopy for greater visibility and enlarged tail surfaces for better control. Like many of the later marks the F24 was fitted with the more powerful Griffon engine which provided a 160kph (100mph) greater top speed than the early Spitfires and almost twice the rate of climb. The weight of firepower from its cannon had tripled over the types’ original fit of eight machineguns. It is perhaps a mark of the propaganda value of the Spitfire name that this very different machine was not re-named.

Tracking the Bolt Action Home Guard Mark IV Tank

I am in the process of building a Bolt Action 28mm Home Guard force, I did want to add some armour to them with a Mark IV Male World War One tank put into service, even if it was merely as a mobile pillbox.

The Bovington Tank Museum has on display a Mark IV Male tank that was used just in this way. It was used in World War One and then presented to the Navy. When war broke out in September 1939, the Tank Mark IV (Male) number 2324 was refurbished for Home Guard duties.

Having constructed and undercoated the Mark IV Tank the next stage was a base coat of Army Green Spray from the Army Painter range. I then used a Humbrol Tank Grey 67 spray for the dark colour camouflage pattern.

For the tracks I used Citadel Gorthor Brown.

The blu-tak I used for the masking took a bit of the paint off.

Next step will be a wash.

 

Hawker Hart

The Hawker Hart is a British two-seater biplane light bomber aircraft that saw service with the Royal Air Force (RAF). It was designed during the 1920s by Sydney Camm and manufactured by Hawker Aircraft. The Hart was a prominent British aircraft in the inter-war period, but was obsolete and already side-lined for newer monoplane aircraft designs by the start of the Second World War, playing only minor roles in the conflict before being retired.

Several major variants of the Hart were developed, including a navalised version for the Royal Navy’s aircraft carriers.

This Hawker Hart was on display at the Royal Air Force Museum London in London. The 13th off the production line, it first flew in 1931 but never saw military use. Under the civilian registration G-ABMR, it was used by Hawker in various roles, including testbed, demonstration aircraft and a camera aircraft. It flew throughout the Second World War and continued flying until 1971. Still airworthy, it was then transferred to the RAF Museum, on loan from Hawker Siddeley, Hawker Aircraft’s successor company. It remains there, painted to represent RAF Hart serial number J9941.

There is a Hawker Hart on display at RAF Cosford.

Vartijan Exo-Driller

The Vartijan Exo-Driller has been revealed over on the Warhammer Community website to accompany Squat Prospectors on their most dangerous digs

These suits of rugged exo-armour were originally designed to protect Squat miners in the most hostile environments – and the ash wastes definitely qualify. They’ve been upgraded over the centuries with heavier weapons and better defences, and Prospector gangs now bring them along to fight off Ash Waste Nomads or other hostiles trying to claim the prime dig sites out in the Necromundan badlands.

Very much a Squat terminator (or even dreadnought) this is a fun model and lots of potential both for and beyond Necromunda.

It is reminiscent of the Squat Exo-Armour of old. It does make me wonder what else we will see over the next few years.

 

 

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Basecoating the Adeptus Titanicus Manufactorum Imperialis

I have had the Manufactorum Imperialis box on my wishlist for a while now. So was pleased to receive the box recently as a present.

The Manufactorum Imperialis box allows you build terrain and scenery for your Adeptus Titanicus battle. I used one large and one small sprue in the first instance to construct the models.

I gave the models a white undercoat using a Citadel Corax White spray.

For the crane I sprayed the bottom half with a Citadel Leadbelcher spray, for the actual crane I used Citadel Zandri Dust.

I used Citadel Zandri Dust on the containers and some of the silos.

For the other silos and the conduits I used Citadel Leadbelcher spray.

Thunderbolt

The Thunderbolt was one of the three most important American fighters produced during the war and saw extensive service with the United States Army Air Force before its comparatively late introduction into RAF operational service in 1944.

This big and strongly built fighter-bomber, with its good low level performance and long range made an ideal replacement for the RAF’s Hurricane fighter-bombers operating over Burma. The RAF only used the Thunderbolt against the Japanese in South East Asia Command.

By 1944 air/ground co-operation had been successfully developed into a powerful tactical tool and RAF Thunderbolts in Burma quickly adopted ‘cab rank’ patrols available to attack any enemy ground target holding up the Allied advance. Directed by ground visual control posts, the Thunderbolts, with their heavy gun armament and 500lb bombs, created havoc amongst Japanese troop concentrations and their supply lines.

During the air battles leading to the re-capture of Rangoon, RAF Thunderbolts flew fighter escort missions with RAF Liberator bombers.

By the end of 1945 RAF Thunderbolt squadrons were re-equipping with Hawker Tempest Is but some units were sent to Batavia in an attempt to re-introduce Dutch colonial rule. Whilst there they undertook a number of bombing missions against Indonesian guerillas and rebel airfields.

Armadillo Improvised Armoured Vehicle

The Armadillo was an armoured fighting vehicle produced in Britain during the invasion crisis of 1940-1941. Based on a number of standard lorry chassis, it comprised a wooden fighting compartment protected by a layer of gravel filling the walls of the ‘fort’ and a driver’s cab protected by mild steel plates.

This vehicle was used by the RAF for airfield defence and later the Home Guard, making it an ideal addition to my Home Guard forces for Bolt Action.

Having constructed the model I gave it a white spray undercoat. After the model had it’s white spray undercoat and this had dried, I then undercoated the underside of the model with a black spray, before giving the top of the model a spray with British Armour Green.

I painted the unarmoured windows with black paint. The wheels were painted with Vallejo 70.862 Black Grey.

I then masked the model with blu-tak.

I then used a Humbrol Tank Grey 67 spray for the dark colour.

See the workbench feature on the Armadillo Improvised Armoured Vehicle.