Adeptus Titanicus Titans

For me, on my visit to Warhammer World in January, one thing I did appreciate seeing, as I hadn’t really seen them before were the numerous Adeptus Titanicus Titans on display, both in isolation but also the various dioramas.

This is a Reaver Battle Titan. A gargantuan war machine, the Reaver Titan is one of the most common and destructive classes of Battle Titan. Armed with devastating weapons and able to crush enemies under its tread by the score, the ground shakes as the Reaver advances and the enemy is left with a choice: flee or die. Reavers are the heart of the Titan Legions, holding the line or leading the charge as their Princeps demand.

Here loyal forces advance on their traitorous brethren. In the middle is a huge Warlord Titan.

Warlord Battle Titans bestride the battlefields of the Imperium, their thunderous tread heralding the destruction of the enemies of Mankind. A mainstay of the Collegia Titanica, Warlord Battle Titans are among the largest and most powerful war machines ever devised by the Mechanicum.

At the forefront at Reaver Titans taking fire, accompanied by smaller Warhound Titans.

The bestial appearance of the Warhound Scout Titan reveals its purpose to the enemy – a savage hunter in the vanguard of the Titan Legions. Despite its size – still towering over tanks and Knights – the Warhound carries an astounding array of formidable weaponry, proving more than enough to bring down most foes it might face; when fielded as a maniple, combining their firepower in a devastating salvo, Warhounds can be trusted to change the face of a battle in seconds.

See more photographs of Adeptus Titanicus Titans.

Cheaper Second Edition

Just bought Star Wars X-Wing Second Edition on Amazon for just £12.99.

Fantasy Flight Games X-Wing Second Edition

The boxed set includes three models, two TIE Fighters and an X-Wing.

From the skies of scarif in Rogue one to the climactic clash above Endor in return of the Jedi, starfighter have played a pivotal role in almost every defining battle of the galactic civil War. During these confrontations, the brave members of the Rebel Alliance faced seemingly insurmountable odds, squaring off against the merciless forces of the galactic Empire in intense, ship-to-ship space combat. Since its release, x-wing miniatures game has invited you to enter the Star Wars galaxy and play out your own battles with some of the series’ most iconic starfighter. LEADING custom-built squadrons into fast-paced, high-stakes battles, you’ve flown with the galactic Empire, the Rebel Alliance, and the Scum and villainy of the galaxy in countless battles. You’ve modified your ships for every Scrap of speed, manoeuvrability, and firepower. Now, it’s time for a new chapter in your x-wing journey. X-Wing second edition puts you in command of your own Squadron of advanced starfighters locked in thrilling, tactical space combat. Following in the footsteps of the first edition, the second edition refines the intuitive and exciting core Formula of manoeuvring your ships into position by placing a central focus on the visceral thrill of flying Star ships in the Star Wars galaxy. With three fully assembled and beautifully pre-painted ships, and all the cards, movement tools, tokens, and dice that you need to get flying with the second edition, the x-wing second edition core set is the perfect way to introduce yourself to the new mechanics or experience x-wing for the first time.

In September last year I blogged about getting the first edition for this kind of price using Keepa. I forgot I had set up triggers for the second edition, so it was nice to get the alert to enable me to get it for the cheap price.

Buy it on Amazon.

Chaos Great Unclean One

The Great Unclean Ones are Nurgle’s mightiest daemons. Towering over their enemies, these living hillocks of rotting flesh lumber across the battlefield swinging their rusted weapons, vomiting streams of filth and unleashing diseased magics upon the foe. Great Unclean Ones are terrifying when roused to wrath, wading through enemy ranks, crushing foes beneath their bulk and pulping survivors with their enormous swords and flails. Some toll rusted summoning bells to draw forth fresh daemons, while others unleash terrible outbreaks of magical plague.

Great Unclean One

From the displays at Warhammer World.

Legion Glaive

This is one huge tank.

Legion Glaive
Legion Glaive at Warhammer World

I do like these retro models. Very nostalgic reminds of those early days of Warhammer 40K, which shows how old I am, because I do remember those days. I bought Rogue Trader when it came out.

The Glaive Super-heavy Special Weapons Tank is a variant of the Fellblade. Armed with a Volkite Carronade, it is designed to destroy xenos beasts and incinerate enemy light vehicles at a single sweep.

While the Glaive has been issued to all eighteen Legiones Astartes in limited quantities, the Salamanders and Dark Angels have long been noted to field Glaives as a matter of course; the XVIIIth Legion’s artifice is more than sufficient to maintain and replicate the arcane Volkite technology, while the provenance and honour of the Ist Legion means that their war matériel and weaponry are ancient indeed.

GKN Saxon APC

Very much a vehicle for the Cold War era.

GKN Sankey Saxon APC

The Saxon was intended to act as a cheap but efficient “battle-taxi” for units that would have to make long journeys from the UK to reinforce the British Army of the Rhine. It was made as a relatively low cost armoured personnel carrier based on a revised Bedford M series 4×4 truck chassis and other commercially available components. As a lightly armoured wheeled vehicle, it is much faster – especially on roads – and easier to maintain than a tracked vehicle. Indeed, it shares many parts with commercial trucks, reducing the operating cost. It is armoured against small-arms fire and shell splinters, but is not intended to stand up to any anti-vehicle weaponry. The vehicle has a single machine gun for local air defence.

Painting the scrap piles and barricades

All Mekboyz can perform battlefield repairs using no more than a weighty wrench-hammer, a sack of nails and a healthy dose of gumption, but most do their best work in the comfortably anarchic surrounds of their own workshop. Meks are more than capable of cobbling together a workspace from whatever is lying about, with rudimentary workshops springing up from battlefield wreckage even while the bullets are still flying. Greenskin vehicles roar toward such teetering structures, their crews throwing sacks of teef at the resident Mek – he and his crew get to work immediately, sending the Ork customers on their way with snazzier guns, souped-up engines and extra armour plates.

I have been thinking about getting this kit for a while now. So on a recent shopping trip to my local games shop I decided to make an impulse purchase and buy the box. Well it was nearly 30% cheaper than on the GW site (and it’s out of stock on their website).

As well as the named workshop you also get three barricades and three piles of scrap. Before starting on the workshop part of the kit I decided I would paint the scrap piles and barricades. Having cleaned the plastic parts I gave them a Corax White undercoat.

I then started painting the basecoat across the scrap piles and barricades using a combination of Base and Contrast Citadel paints.

For this barricade I painted a key part of it with Leadbelcher and Contrast Cygor Brown.

I wasn’t too impressed with the Cygor Brown, it covered well, but there wasn’t too much contrast.

On this scrap pile I painted the Imperial ammo chest and the dented oil drum with Contrast Militarum Green and the tyres I did with Contrast Basilicanum Grey.

The majority of this scrap pile was painted with Leadbelcher and some parts were done with Contrast Cygor Brown.

The tyre I did with Contrast Basilicanum Grey, and as this barricade appears to have figher parts I did these parts with Base Averland Sunset.

On the largest piece of scrap I did the pile of tyres with Contrast Basilicanum Grey, whilst the chest was done with Contrast Militarum Green.

Contrast Cygor Brown was used for some parts of the pile.

See the workbench feature on all parts of the Ork Mekboy Workshop.

Blood on the Streets

I have been gaming for a fair few years now, my first experience with Warhammer was the first edition when it came out.

There were so many releases back then that I wanted, but alas the pocket money only stretched so far and it never stretched as much as I wanted.

Across the pages of White Dwarf were adverts for lots of lovely models which I was never going to be able to afford to buy. Occasionally I would see something and I would send off for it.

One advert for a product that remains a strong memory for me was the one for the Blood on the Street Arcane Architecture Village Pack One. This was in the October 1985 edition of White Dwarf, issue number seventy.

After the wholesale slaughter and destruction at Orc’s Drift (Citadel’s latest Warhammer supplement) the time has come to rebuild! Now’s your chance with our first Arcane Architecture village pack. This pack heralds a series of card model buildings designed for the fantasy gamer, Village pack one contains 12 different full-colour building models designed by the award-winning and talented David Andrews. Also Included is a complete guide to The Riding – an out of the way part of the Warhammer World where out of the ordinary things are a part of every day life! The villages of The Riding are described In detail, together with their various Inhabitants. Card colour counters and Warhammer stilts are provided for all non-player characters. Background Information, local rumours, events of interest and scenario suggestions are all included – and can be readily adapted for use in a Warhammer game or fantasy role-playing adventure. An invaluable in any role-playing system. Available now at your local retailer – or post free direct from the Citadel Mail Order Trolls. 

Playing lots of Warhammer Fantasy Battle at the time, this seemed an ideal way to quickly create towns to fight in. 

Now buying stuff back in that day was nowhere as easy as it is now. I didn’t have a credit or debit card, I only had a savings account at the local bank. There wasn’t a world wide web to order form anyhow, and without a bank card I couldn’t phone the Citadel Mail Order Trolls. So I asked a parent to write a cheque which I dutifully sent off to Citadel Miniatures at Chewton Street in Nottinghamshire.

Now I know differently, but at the time I assumed somewhat naively that Citadel would have these in stock and I would get them by return of post. So I remember calculating in my head roughly when it would arrive. I would patiently as long as possible for the post to arrive before heading off to Sixth Form College and if it hadn’t come, rushing home afterwards to see if it had come later. It hadn’t…

In the end it took weeks to arrive. Either they had sold out their initial stock and did a reprint, or more likely they advertised the product before it was actually ready to release. Which it was I would never know. Though this experience did put me off mail order for a fair few years.

When it eventually arrived, I was amazed. I had spent £5.95 on a booklet and a load of card. That’s a little disingenuous, this was a fantastic product which had huge potential.

Knowing what I know now, I probably would have scanned all the card buildings into a computer or copied them onto card using a colour photo-copier. This wasn’t possible, as a) I didn’t have a computer let alone any kind of scanner (or colour scanner). I remember buying a black and white scanner in the mid-1990s for £500 or thereabouts. I don’t  think consumer scanners were even a thing in 1985! As for a colour photo-copier, well there was a black and white one at college, but colour, wasn’t that science fiction?

So despite not having a copy, I dutifully cut out all the card building pieces and glued them together. They were fantastic, Dave Andrews had done a magnificent job in designing these.

We used them a lot in too many games to mention. Any photographs you ask (knowing how many photographs I have on this blog)? Well as well as not owning a computer, a scanner or a colour printer, I also didn’t own a camera! I didn’t really start taking photographs of models until the late 1990s. So I have no visual record of these buildings. I am not sure exactly what happened to them in the end, as used them for a fair few years, but I think they may have either been left behind when I went off to university or they got crushed and binned after a move.

Whatever happened to them I have great memories of those buildings and the games we played in and around them. I was always disappointed with Village Pack Two, Terror of the Lichemaster, which wasn’t as good, but added to the building stock.

With the wealth of plastic scenery kits these days, these card buildings look a poor relation, but at the time they were so much better than anything around, and unless you were going to spend hours making your own scenery, they added much needed depth and excitement to games of Warhammer.

Legio Custodes Ares Gunship

The Ares is a potent terror weapon, bypassing enemy armies as it blazes over their lines in the shadow of its eclipse shields. Using its immensely destructive Arachnus magna-blaze cannon against the monuments and edifices which an enemy culture hold most dear to their hearts, it strikes a decisive blow against their will to wage war.

This Legio Custodes Ares Gunship was on display at Warhammer World.

Legio Custodes Ares Gunship
Legio Custodes Ares Gunship at Warhammer World

This heavily-armed super-heavy gunship is ideal for taking out large targets such as monsters and vehicles, and even packs enough of punch to take down the void shields of Titans. It is protected by its eclipse shield, making it nigh-on impervious to return fire.

Known as the Legio Custodes during the Great Crusade and Horus Heresy eras, the Adeptus Custodes, is the Imperial Adepta responsible for protecting the Imperial Palace and the physical body of the Emperor of Mankind, as well as serving as His most important emissaries, His companions, and the keepers of His many secrets.

Legio Custodes Miniatures Gallery

Eldar Falcon Grav Tank

With its potent armament and ability to carry a small squad of fighters, the Falcon is designed to take the fight to the enemy, or to extricate the warriors should resistance prove too fierce.

The Falcon is the primary battle tank of the Eldar army, its curved silhouette a familiar but much-dreaded sight to their enemies. The Falcon has a twin role upon the field of battle. It has a passenger compartment enabling it to carry a small squad of fighters to the battle front or rescue a beleaguered unit when resistance proves too fierce. It also carries a lethal assortment of heavy weaponry, and advanced targeters that allow it to fire devastating salvos while on the move.

From the displays at Warhammer World.

Eldar Falcon

Forge World Aeronautica Imperialis Pre-Orders

We’ve known about them for a while now, but the Arvus Lighter and Vulture Gunship are now on pre-order from the Forge World website.

These are the first releases for (the new) Aeronautica Imperialis boxed game from Forge World and hopefully will be the first of many new releases for Aeronautica Imperialis in the future. I recently posted a blog post about my thinking of what’s next for Aeronautica Imperialis.

So what of the new models?

First there is the Arvus Lighter, an Imperial transport.

Arvus Lighter

The Arvus Lighter is a workhorse of the Imperium. Transporting both vital cargo and critical personnel, even from orbit, they’re small and fast enough to slip through war zones that would prove too difficult for larger, more cumbersome craft. While armoured, they are completely unarmed, relying on support from escort aircraft in active battles. Affectionately called “the hog” or “little pig”, this scout-class ship is a common sight on battlefields across the galaxy.

Completely unarmed, maybe not the best option for a game of Aeronautica Imperialis, however as an objective for a scenario, it could prove useful.

This small model comprised of nine parts looks very much the part.

The other release is the Vulture Gunship.

Vulture Gunship

Squadrons of Valkyrie Assault Carriers are often supported by these heavily armed dedicated gunships. The Vulture sacrifices troop-carrying capacity in favour of a massive engine and souped-up power plant, delivering serious firepower via underslung hard points. When armed with a Punisher Cannon, they can unleash devastating fusillades to annihilate targets at medium range.

I did think that these are lovely little miniatures, but was a little surprised by the price, well why would I be surprised by the price, it’s Forge World! Having said that £26 gets you four Valkyrie Assault Carriers, whilst the Vulture costs £30 for just two.

Having said that, I do like both models and am seriously thinking about getting some.