Achilles-Alpha Pattern Land Raider

The Achilles-Alpha pattern Land Raider is the most durable vehicle currently in the service of the Legiones Astartes.  This is the version on display at Warhammer World.

Achilles-Alpha Pattern Land Raider
Achilles-Alpha Pattern Land Raider

These vehicles shrug off weapon strikes that would cripple other battle tanks, and are proof against even the most toxic environment.

Achilles-Alpha Pattern Land Raider
Achilles-Alpha Pattern Land Raider

The weaponry of these vehicles is formidable, featuring an advanced quad launcher and powerful volkite batteries.

Achilles-Alpha Pattern Land Raider
Achilles-Alpha Pattern Land Raider

Rolls Royce Armoured Car

The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used during the First World War, Irish Civil War, the inter-war period in Imperial Air Control in Transjordan, Israel and Mesopotamia, and in the early stages of the Second World War in the Middle East and North Africa. The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) raised the first British armoured car squadron during the First World War.

This Rolls Royce Armoured Car is the oldest vehicle at the Tank Museum still in running order.

It is a hundred years old, built at Rolls Royce’s Derby Works in 1920 and first saw service in Ireland the next year.

It’s painted as it was with the 5th ACC in Shanghai.

Spent time in Scarborough between 1922 and 1927, it was then shipped to Shanghai for 2 years before spending 1929 to 1938 in Egypt with the 5th Armoured Car Company, Royal Tank Corps, 12th Royal Lancers and 11th Hussars. After taking part in anti-invasion patrols with the 1st Derbyshire Yeomanry the car came to Bovington in 1940 and joined The Tank Museum collection in 1946.

See the workbench feature on the Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car.

See the workbench feature on my 15mm Flames of War Rolls Royce Armoured Car.

 

Harlequin Flyers

Harlequins are the Eldar followers of Cegorach, the Laughing God. They are the performers and entertainers of the Eldar, the self-appointed protectors of the Eldar’s pre-Fall history, which they perform in extremely elaborate plays involving not only elaborate costumes, scenery, acrobatics, and a troupe of dedicated actors, but further elaboration of the drama through psykana and psychedelic drugs.

These beautifully painted Harlequin flyers were on display at Warhammer World.

This is a Harlequins Starweaver. I think one of the reasons I would not paint up a Harlequin army is the necessity to paint large amounts of checked areas.

Starweavers streak across the battlefield as a storm of shattered light, relying upon a mixture of velocity and misdirection to confound the enemy’s aim. These swift attack vehicles have a transport platform at their rear capable of bearing a Harlequin Troupe into battle.

The more heavily armed Voidweaver is shown here.

Boasting a veritable arsenal of heavy weaponry, Voidweavers leave flaming devastation in their wake. Their every salvo sees enemies punched off their feet as storms of shuriken scream through the air, and enemy tanks are vaporised by the deadly prismatic cannon.

This is a Skyweaver.

Heavily armed and incredibly fast, squads of Skyweavers outmanoeuvre their foes before cutting them to pieces with concentrated firepower. Their ripping streams of shuriken fire and crackling bolts of electromagnetic energy slaughter foot troops and reduce enemy tanks to sparking wrecks with equal ease.

Mitsubishi Ki-46 ‘Dinah’

One of the most elegant aircraft of World War Two, the ‘Dinah’ was so successful that Germany tried (in vain) to acquire manufacturing rights from Japan. Although fighter and ground attack versions were developed, it was in the high-altitude photographic reconnaissance role that the Ki46 excelled. Given allied codename ‘Dinah’, this aircraft combined high speed with long range and was able to cover the entire Pacific theatre of operations with little opposition.

This Mitsubishi Ki-46 ‘Dinah’ was on display at RAF Cosford.

Having first flown in November 1939, performance trials showed the prototype Ki46-I’s top speed to be 64kph (40mph) lower than the requirement, although at 540kph (336mph) it was still faster than the latest Japanese fighters! Ki46s were first used operationally over China, their speed enabling them to avoid interception by the few fighters available to the Chinese.

Before the highly successful Japanese campaign against the British in Malaya, detailed reconnaissance of the area was carried out by a Ki46 unit. Detachments of Japanese Army Air Force Ki46s were soon deployed to cover most of South-east Asia and their success led to the Japanese Navy operating a small number of Dinahs.

Although Dinahs became vulnerable to fast-climbing Allied fighters towards the end of the war, they still managed to make many reconnaissance flights over the large, well-defended airbases in the Mariana Islands that the Americans were using for massed bomber raids against Japan in 1944 and 1945.

Assembling the workshop

All Mekboyz can perform battlefield repairs using no more than a weighty wrench-hammer, a sack of nails and a healthy dose of gumption, but most do their best work in the comfortably anarchic surrounds of their own workshop. Meks are more than capable of cobbling together a workspace from whatever is lying about, with rudimentary workshops springing up from battlefield wreckage even while the bullets are still flying. Greenskin vehicles roar toward such teetering structures, their crews throwing sacks of teef at the resident Mek – he and his crew get to work immediately, sending the Ork customers on their way with snazzier guns, souped-up engines and extra armour plates.

I have been thinking about getting this kit for a while now. So on a recent shopping trip to my local games shop I decided to make an impulse purchase and buy the box. As well as the named workshop you also get three barricades and three piles of scrap.

This workshop is the main model from the Ork Mekboy Workshop boxed set. It is the only part of the kit that actually needs to be constructed.

I think what I really like about this model and I am looking forward to painting is the wall of tools.

The parts on the plastic sprues within the box are quite thick and chunky.

They were in some places quite tricky to remove from the sprues.

Continue reading “Assembling the workshop”

Scorpion Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance CVR(T) FV101

Following the posting of my photographs of the Scorpion Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance CVR(T) FV101 from Bovington, here is a Scorpion at Duxford.

Scorpion Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance CVR(T) FV101

I like the big wing mirrors on this tank.

The FV101 Scorpion is a British armoured reconnaissance vehicle. It was the lead vehicle and the fire support type in the Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked), CVR(T), family of seven armoured vehicles. Manufactured by Alvis, it was introduced into service with the British Army in 1973 and served until 1994.

Scorpion became the first of a whole family of fighting vehicles including Scimitar, Striker and Samaritan. It served in the Falklands and the Gulf as well as being a success on the export market. Changes in British policy, and the international situation meant that surviving Scorpions were fitted with a new weapon, the 30mm Rarden Cannon, and renamed Sabre.

It has been supplied to Belgium, the Irish Republic, Malaya, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman and Venezuela.

I have some Team Yankee Scorpions, they are currently in the process of being painted as BAOR versions.

Some thoughts on the RAF Regiment Scorpion I saw at RAF Cosford.

Canoptek Spyder

This Canoptek Spyder was on display at Warhammer World.

Canoptek Spyder

Unlike their Necron masters, Canoptek Spyders never sleep, but while away the aeons servicing the structures of their Tomb World. Though the Canoptek Spyder is essentially an automated drone, it is still a formidable foe when the situation demands. Any enemy foolish enough to stray within reach of the Canoptek Spyder will have flesh scoured from bone by an array of mechanical tools and pincers. If a triad of Canoptek Spyders operate together, one takes overall command, harnessing the processing capacity of the others to create a supermind far greater than the sum of its parts. This hyper-efficiency is passed on to all Canoptek Wraiths and Canoptek Scarabs in the immediate vicinity, allowing a co-ordinated and precise response to any threat – and ensuring the safety of their slumbering masters.

Shading the Beast

Probably my favourite Indiana Jones film is Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. The combination of archaeology, mythology, nazi soldiers and lots of wonderful pulp action. Though we know it wasn’t real, and though we know that there was no actual historical version of it; I am sure most of us who have thought about recreating the Indiana Jones films on the table have wanted to use that tank. It appears at first glance to be a Mark VIII with a turret, the reality was that it was built specially for the film and was built up from an excavator.

I wrote back in 2012 about finding a 28mm model of the tank, since then I found it was available from Empress Miniatures, I was able to order it and go through the resin pieces and constructing the Mark IX Beast. Following the application of the white undercoat, I started the base coat of Vallejo 70912 Tan Yellow on the Mark IX Beast tank.

Having thought about the result and I didn’t like the Tan Yellow, I went ahead and made the decision to repaint the tank with Citadel Layer colour, Ushabti Bone.

The tracks were painted with Karak Stone. One of the things I noticed from the film, was that the tracks were not that much of a different colour to the body of the tank and were also heavily dusty and weathered.

I painted some of the stowage and canvas coverings on the sponson weapons with Karak Stone.

The wooden beam was was painted with Zandri Dust. I did some of the rolled tarpaulins with Morghast Bone and Wraithbone. I also used a Snakebite Leather Contrast paint for the furry looking blanket.

I painted the straps of some of the kit with XV-88. Most of the ammo containers and jerry cans I painted with Karak Stone.

I used Wraithbone and Morghast Bone for some of the lighter kit.

The tank was then given a wash of Citadel Shade, Seraphim Sepia.

I will then drybrush the model as well as further weathering.

See the full workbench feature on the Mark IX Beast tank.

Typhon Heavy Siege Tank

Typhon Heavy Siege Tank

Named for the ‘Great Beast’ of Ancient Terran myth, the immense Typhon Heavy Siege Tank was developed by the Mechanicum alongside the Spartan, with which it shares a basic chassis design.

Typhon Heavy Siege Tank

The Typhon’s primary armament is the massive Dreadhammer cannon, and was created in response to a request from the Primarch Peturabo, master of the Iron Warriors. He demanded a Legiones Astartes war engine that could rival the great batteries of the Imperial Crusade Army in firepower, but manoeuvre and deploy at the speed of a Space Marine force.

Some more photographs of the Typhon Heavy Siege Tank.

Preparing the scrap piles

All Mekboyz can perform battlefield repairs using no more than a weighty wrench-hammer, a sack of nails and a healthy dose of gumption, but most do their best work in the comfortably anarchic surrounds of their own workshop. Meks are more than capable of cobbling together a workspace from whatever is lying about, with rudimentary workshops springing up from battlefield wreckage even while the bullets are still flying. Greenskin vehicles roar toward such teetering structures, their crews throwing sacks of teef at the resident Mek – he and his crew get to work immediately, sending the Ork customers on their way with snazzier guns, souped-up engines and extra armour plates.

I have been thinking about getting this kit for a while now. So on a recent shopping trip to my local games shop I decided to make an impulse purchase and buy the box. Well it was nearly 30% cheaper than on the GW site (and it’s out of stock on their website).

As well as the named workshop you also get three barricades and three piles of scrap.

The parts on the plastic sprues within the box are quite thick and chunky.

This workshop is the main model from the Ork Mekboy Workshop boxed set. It is the only part of the kit that actually needs to be constructed. I think what I really like about this model and I am looking forward to painting is the wall of tools.

The parts on the plastic sprues within the box are quite thick and chunky.

Before starting on the workshop part of the kit I decided I would paint the scrap piles and barricades.  Continue reading “Preparing the scrap piles”