Assembling the workshop

All Mekboyz can perform battlefield repairs using no more than a weighty wrench-hammer, a sack of nails and a healthy dose of gumption, but most do their best work in the comfortably anarchic surrounds of their own workshop. Meks are more than capable of cobbling together a workspace from whatever is lying about, with rudimentary workshops springing up from battlefield wreckage even while the bullets are still flying. Greenskin vehicles roar toward such teetering structures, their crews throwing sacks of teef at the resident Mek – he and his crew get to work immediately, sending the Ork customers on their way with snazzier guns, souped-up engines and extra armour plates.

I have been thinking about getting this kit for a while now. So on a recent shopping trip to my local games shop I decided to make an impulse purchase and buy the box. As well as the named workshop you also get three barricades and three piles of scrap.

This workshop is the main model from the Ork Mekboy Workshop boxed set. It is the only part of the kit that actually needs to be constructed.

I think what I really like about this model and I am looking forward to painting is the wall of tools.

The parts on the plastic sprues within the box are quite thick and chunky.

They were in some places quite tricky to remove from the sprues.

Continue reading “Assembling the workshop”

Shading the Beast

Probably my favourite Indiana Jones film is Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. The combination of archaeology, mythology, nazi soldiers and lots of wonderful pulp action. Though we know it wasn’t real, and though we know that there was no actual historical version of it; I am sure most of us who have thought about recreating the Indiana Jones films on the table have wanted to use that tank. It appears at first glance to be a Mark VIII with a turret, the reality was that it was built specially for the film and was built up from an excavator.

I wrote back in 2012 about finding a 28mm model of the tank, since then I found it was available from Empress Miniatures, I was able to order it and go through the resin pieces and constructing the Mark IX Beast. Following the application of the white undercoat, I started the base coat of Vallejo 70912 Tan Yellow on the Mark IX Beast tank.

Having thought about the result and I didn’t like the Tan Yellow, I went ahead and made the decision to repaint the tank with Citadel Layer colour, Ushabti Bone.

The tracks were painted with Karak Stone. One of the things I noticed from the film, was that the tracks were not that much of a different colour to the body of the tank and were also heavily dusty and weathered.

I painted some of the stowage and canvas coverings on the sponson weapons with Karak Stone.

The wooden beam was was painted with Zandri Dust. I did some of the rolled tarpaulins with Morghast Bone and Wraithbone. I also used a Snakebite Leather Contrast paint for the furry looking blanket.

I painted the straps of some of the kit with XV-88. Most of the ammo containers and jerry cans I painted with Karak Stone.

I used Wraithbone and Morghast Bone for some of the lighter kit.

The tank was then given a wash of Citadel Shade, Seraphim Sepia.

I will then drybrush the model as well as further weathering.

See the full workbench feature on the Mark IX Beast tank.

Preparing the scrap piles

All Mekboyz can perform battlefield repairs using no more than a weighty wrench-hammer, a sack of nails and a healthy dose of gumption, but most do their best work in the comfortably anarchic surrounds of their own workshop. Meks are more than capable of cobbling together a workspace from whatever is lying about, with rudimentary workshops springing up from battlefield wreckage even while the bullets are still flying. Greenskin vehicles roar toward such teetering structures, their crews throwing sacks of teef at the resident Mek – he and his crew get to work immediately, sending the Ork customers on their way with snazzier guns, souped-up engines and extra armour plates.

I have been thinking about getting this kit for a while now. So on a recent shopping trip to my local games shop I decided to make an impulse purchase and buy the box. Well it was nearly 30% cheaper than on the GW site (and it’s out of stock on their website).

As well as the named workshop you also get three barricades and three piles of scrap.

The parts on the plastic sprues within the box are quite thick and chunky.

This workshop is the main model from the Ork Mekboy Workshop boxed set. It is the only part of the kit that actually needs to be constructed. I think what I really like about this model and I am looking forward to painting is the wall of tools.

The parts on the plastic sprues within the box are quite thick and chunky.

Before starting on the workshop part of the kit I decided I would paint the scrap piles and barricades.  Continue reading “Preparing the scrap piles”

It’s red

For Bolt Action I am in the process of painting some partisans to fight Simon’s Italians. I have been looking for some vehicles and  Warlord Games actually make a fair few civilian models for Bolt Action. Looking through the Bolt Action website I quite liked the look of the Civilian 1000Kg Dropside Truck so I got one.

Having given the model a white undercoat, I then gave the rear of the truck (which was separate) a basecoat of Vallejo 70912 Tan Yellow. I then gave that a wash of Seraphim Sepia Shade which was a little too light, so I then gave a wash of Agrax Earthshade. I also gave the chassis, the tyres and wheels a base coat of Vallejo 70.862 Black Grey.

After much thought, I decided to take the risk and paint the bodywork of the truck red.

I used Citadel Mephiston Red as the base colour and I am quite pleased with how it turned out.

It still needs a wash and weathering, but the colour works for me.

I then took some Abaddon Black to paint the windows and chassis.

I also decided in the end to paint the running boards red.

See the workbench feature on the Citroen Civilian 1000Kg Dropside Truck.

Going back to the Battlewagon.

This plastic battlewagon kit was released by Games Workshop on the 3rd January 2009 and I picked mine up on the 4th January. I had hoped to paint the model quite quickly, well nearly ten years later, maybe not.

The last stage I left the model was back in 2010 when I had drybrushed the black parts of the model. It then got left for a while, well it got left for quite a few years!

So I recently unearthed it from storage with the intention of finishing it off. It was in seperate parts still, so for this photograph I fitted the parts to see how the model could look.

I had used my old method for painting vehicles, which was to paint the “metal” parts with Chaos Black and then use a different colour on the bodywork. I had used a masking process in painting the superstructure and keeping the underbody black. I decided not to repaint the black parts and just use weathering techniques to lighten their dark colour.

I did consider respraying the model as I had done with the Kill Bursta with Zandri Dust spray, but in the end decided I wanted it to look different to the Kill Bursta.

I painted some details of the model with Ushabti Bone. I also used XV-88 and Balor Brown on some of the panels. This is really to break up the predominant colour of the model. However I didn’t do too many, as I didn’t want a patchwork effect.

I washed the model with Seraphim Sepia Shade, before using some Nuln Oil and Agrax Earthshade shades on specific parts of the model.

Continue reading “Going back to the Battlewagon.”

Working more on the Grot Krew

Across my Ork Big Gunz, heavy vehicles, even my Stompa, I have a variety of Grot Krew that need painting. This post shows where I had got so far with them.

The next stage was finishing off the detailing and clothing on the models.

These Grot Krew are from the Forge World Big Zzappa, though there is a Stompa Krew Grot in the first photograph.

I painted the nails and claws of the Grots with Ushabti Bone and then highlighted with Wraithbone. I painted the trousers of one of the Grots with Ushabti Bone and the other with XV-88.

These are from the Stompa kit and the Skorcha.

I did some more with the Grots. In the main I painted some clothing using various shades of khaki and brown. I highlighted the screwdriver with Stormhost Silver. I washed the pistols with Nuln Oil.

I an pretty happy with the Grot with the Wrench from the Skorcha kit. Not sure what I am going to do with the eyes, probably black and then a spot of red.

I used various greys to paint the bandana of the screwdriver yielding Grot.

These Grots are from the Kill Kannon.

For the Kill Kannon observer, I painted a lens effect on the observing tool. I painted the entire lens with Thunderhawk Blue and then used Lothern Blue for the reflection before finally adding a drop of white at the top. On the other side of the device I used a drop of Mephiston Red.

For the loader, the one with the helmet, I painted his jacket with XV-88 and then highlighted with a mix of XV-88 and Ushabti Bone.

I have a fair few other Grot Krew I need to clean, base and paint.

These are the Krew from the Supa Kannon and their ammo crate.

Once I cleaned up the models I glued them temporarily to bases and then gave them a white undercoat of Corax White.

Shading the Kill Bursta

I have had my Kill Bursta hanging around on the workbench for a while now, so it’s nice to make some significant progress on the model.

Forge World’s big Ork tank mounts a huge gun ready to take on any Imperial BaneBlade or even Titan. The Kill Bursta mounts a huge-bore Kannon capable of destroying bunkers and siegeworks with ease.

The last time I looked at the model I had given the model a double undercoat of white and black and then using a thinned Chaos Black I touched up the black basecoat. I also black undercoated certain parts of the engine.

The first thing I did was something different and sprayed the upper surfaces of the model with Citadel Spray Zandri Dust. Using a brush I painted the tracks with Gorthor Brown. I did the engine with Leadbelcher, rather than drybrushing with Tin Bitz over a black undercoat.

I started painting some of the panels with other colours, notably Balor Brown and Ushabti Bone. This is really to break up the predominant colour of the model. However I didn’t do too many, as I didn’t want a patchwork effect.

I retained the dark black undercoat on the front prow and didn’t spray that too much as I quite liked the idea that this was dirty and weathered compared to the rest of the tank.

I did consider painting the main weapon with Leadbelcher, which is something I had seen on other people’s Kill Bursta models, but in the end I went with the base colour instead.

I also did some of the chains and piping with Leadbelcher.

The next stage was a bit of a challenge in using various Citadel shades, though mainly Seraphim Sepia to add shadow to the model.

I did use a large 1/2 Round Mop brush which helped.

I think I might need to revisit the shading and also look at overpainting those areas where the shade had pooled as well.

See the workbench feature on the Kill Bursta.

Adeptus Titanicus Imperial Knights

I hadn’t actually planned this purchase of some Imperial Knights for Adeptus Titanicus. As part of a prize draw I had to top up my purchases to get past £50, so rather than buy more paint, I looked to see what models I could buy.

I have had the Adeptus Titanicus rules for a while now but I’ve not actually got any models to have a game with! I have been meaning to get some Titans, but apart from really wanting to wait for the Ork Gargants (which I guess will never appear) it was more of a yearning to get some. I knew how much I had to paint of other stuff, so purchasing more models to sit on the shelf for a years wasn’t in my mind a good plan. However having bought, built and painted a fair few Aeronautica Imperialis planes rather more quickly than I would normally take I have been thinking about getting some tiny Titans.

So when browsing what to get, I thought, why not get some tiny Titans, well the big titans for Adeptus Titanicus aren’t exactly cheap, so I decided that I would go for a box of knights. This box was just £17 (after discount) so I thought, yes, that takes me over £50 and I get some tiny knights as well.

Acting as scouts for the Titans of the Adeptus Titanicus, Imperial Knights support their titan legions with speed and agility granted to them by their small stature.

This multi-part plastic kit contains the components necessary to assemble 3 Imperial Knights for use in games of Adeptus Titanicus. Each of these machines is armed with a reaper chainsword, with a thermal cannon, rapid fire battlecannon, avenger gatling cannon and 3 heavy stubbers available (1 of which can be optionally replaced with a meltagun.) These are highly detailed miniatures which, though at the scale used to play Adeptus Titanicus, are as impressive to behold as their larger brethren – thick armour plating, a curved carapace, exposed hydraulics and visible engine blocks/exhausts are hallmarks of the kit, with each also featuring its own tilting plate.

Within the box is a single sprue with the parts for the three Imperial Knights.

You also get three 40mm bases, transfers and instructions.

What I didn’t realise was that this particular boxed set is now out of print. You can still get the knights, but they come now with a sprue of extra weapons.

I am quite looking forward to building and painting these models.

Sorting my paints out!

Having some time over the weekend I decided it was time to sort out my collection of paints, washes and inks.

Painting more models now, meant that I have been going out to my local games shop to buy new paints. I realise that I must check what I have before buying paints, I now have three full pots of Ushabti Bone as well as two pots of Death World Forest. I wanted these colours, but didn’t realise I already had some in my collection.

I knew I had a few boxes of paints on my workbench, sorted a little by age, but there were various other paints across the workbench and a few hanging around with some sprue and stuff. I also had some paints that I had picked up from copies of Warhammer Conquest as well. I went through them and sorted them by make and colour. Sadly there were way too many I had to throw out due to age and being completely dried out. My painting history in many ways is defined by my paint purchasing history.

Like many (older) gamers I started painting my early Warhammer models with small tins of Humbrol enamel. My painting was very much followed my painting of Airfix and Matchbox model kits. Single colours, no shading or highlighting.

I do remember on a visit to the first Games Workshop shop in Hammersmith and looking at the models there on display marvelling at the amazing paintwork the painter had achieved, also having no real idea about how to even some close to that.

The Citadel released their acrylic Citadel Colour paints back in 1985. There were two set and individual colours. I remember buying Set 1 which included classic colour such as Skull White, Chaos Black as well as the never covered anything Sunburst Yellow. I do remember really liking the Enchanted Blue and using that a lot on some models. The boxed set cost £4.95 with individual paints at 60p each!

I used these paints a lot over that time to paint models. Some were difficult to use over black undercoats, so much so that often I would paint over the undercoat with white paint to ensure the colour would cover the part of the model I was painting.

My painting technique also started to evolve as well, though I did enter the first Golden Demon Award, I never stood a chance of winning!

I started initially using a black undercoat, and in some cases then just drybrushing the models. No basecoats, no layers, just drybrushing! This really didn’t work very well and so moved onto base coat and highlighting with some dry brushing on those kinds of things that work well with drybrushing, such as fur and wood.

Though I did start to use some blended and highlighting techniques and some of my models I was quite pleased with from that time.

I did start to use a fair few Tamiya Acrylic paints, in the main for bases. Their more naturalistic subdued and military colours made for better colours for bases I thought. Their Flat Green was so much nicer I thought than the Goblin Green that you would see on GW models.

Another paint I used a bit at this time was the Humbrol Acrylic range. Very small pots in comparison to Citadel and Tamiya, but they did have one drawback, the lids soon became very ill-fitting due to dried paint, so they would dry out so much faster than other paints in my collection.

One dramatic change to my painting technique was the release of the Citadel Inks. The Chestnut ink was a staple of my workbench for many years, though I didn’t like the glossy effect you got with the inks. 

It was a revelation when I realised, that by adding some ordinary paint to my ink wash, it would remove most if not all of the glossiness. That  changed how I would paint my models.

So when the inks were places with washes, Devlan Mud and Gryphonne Sepia were used extensively.

Another Citadel paint I liked a lot were the Foundation paints. Tausept Ochre became my most popular colour and too many of my models were painted this light sandy brown. I loved how they easily covered a black undercoat. The new Base paints are not as good.

When I got into Flames of War I knew I would need some other kinds of paint to paint the tanks and infantry, so I made quite a substantial purchase of their paints to paint my tanks.

This introduced me to the Vallejo range of paints. Being able to buy these from  a local model shop, made painting much easier, though I was finding it difficult to find the time to paint.

Having made the decision to paint some of my old 40K models, I checked over my blog how I had painted some of the models. The big challenge was that much of the Citadel paint range that I had used back then was now no longer available after Games Workshop changed the complete paint range.

Luckily there was a few places on the web to find out which old paints were replaced by which new ones.

Deciding to paint some models with BoltGun Metal and discovering that wasn’t available, and my last pot had dried up I placed an online order for its replacement, Leadbelcher.

Having sent off for some of this paint, I also included the Ork Flesh Contrast Paint in my order, as I was interested to see how these would work for my Orks. In a test I decided to paint the Krew of my Forge World Ork heavy weapons with the contrast paint.

I have to say I was quite impressed with the results on only a single coat. So much so I bought some of the others in the range to use on different models.

I know I have been painting quite a big as I am now on my third pot of Seraphim Sepia since the beginning of June! I am a fan of the shades, as they allow me to create effective paint schemes without too much effort!

I am never going to be a Golden Demon painter, I don’t have the patience, nor the eyesight, let alone the time to paint something to that standard. What I am trying to do now is paint the models so they are completed to a good level (for me) and they look good on the table.

Ork Mekboy Workshop

All Mekboyz can perform battlefield repairs using no more than a weighty wrench-hammer, a sack of nails and a healthy dose of gumption, but most do their best work in the comfortably anarchic surrounds of their own workshop. Meks are more than capable of cobbling together a workspace from whatever is lying about, with rudimentary workshops springing up from battlefield wreckage even while the bullets are still flying. Greenskin vehicles roar toward such teetering structures, their crews throwing sacks of teef at the resident Mek – he and his crew get to work immediately, sending the Ork customers on their way with snazzier guns, souped-up engines and extra armour plates.

I have been thinking about getting this kit for a while now. So on a recent shopping trip to my local games shop I decided to make an impulse purchase and buy the box. Well it was nearly 30% cheaper than on the GW site (and it’s out of stock on their website).

As well as the named workshop you also get three barricades and three piles of scrap.

The parts on the plastic sprues within the box are quite thick and chunky.

The model looks like it should be quite good fun to paint.Ork Mekboy Workshop

I think these will go with the Cities of Death resin Ork Barricades I have had for a while now.