Airspeed Oxford

The Airspeed Oxford was a military development of the same company’s Envoy airliner. The prototype first flew on 19 June 1937 and when it entered service with the Central Flying School in November of that year it became the Royal Air Force’s first twin-engine monoplane advanced trainer.

As a consequence of the outbreak of war, many thousands of Oxfords were ordered by Britain and its allies, including Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, Poland, and the United States. Following the end of the conflict, the Oxford continued to achieve export sales for some time, equipping the newly formed air forces of Egypt, India, Israel, and Yugoslavia. It was considered to be a capable trainer aircraft throughout the conflict, as well as being used as a general-purpose type. A large number of Oxfords have been preserved on static display.

Plastic Land Raider Proteus

Back in April I wrote after seeing the plastic Spartan Land Raider Assault Tank I did wonder if we would see a plastic Land Raider Proteus.

With the announcement of the plastic Spartan Land Raider Assault Tank it got me thinking, will we also a plastic Land Raider Proteus? It wouldn’t be too much of a step to have a plastic kit of this Land Raider? Essentially the Spartan is a stretched Land Raider.

Well today we see that we are going to get a plastic Land Raider Proteus with an announcement on the Warhammer Community site.

Land Raider Proteus

Before the Spartan Assault Tank there was one true king of armoured troop conveyance – the Land Raider. Many patterns of these lumbering tanks exist in Legion armouries, but none have the pedigree of the venerable Land Raider Proteus, which now returns to the Age of Darkness with a new plastic kit.

Land Raider Proteus

Dating back to the Dark Age of Technology, these vehicles are no less capable of surviving the harsh realities of civil war than their more spritely cousins, exhibiting uncommonly strong influence from their machine spirits. There are stories of these tanks continuing to blast away as their crew lie dying, or rumbling back to base with damage that would wreck lesser machines.

I do like this model. It will be a few weeks (months) before it is released, but I am seriously considering getting one.

So, now we are returning full circle to the original plastic Land Raider model which was released in 1988, well very close.

Purity Seals on the Repressor

The Repressor tank is often used by Sisters of Battle as transport, and by the Adeptus Arbites in an anti insurgency role. I said  in a blog post back in 2004 “I do like this model and I am intending to get one to use with my Daemonhunters army as a transport for the Storm Troopers”. I did get one that Christmas as a present. Though I actually started building and painting this model back in 2007, I recently retrieved it from storage and decided that I would try and finish painting it. I realised I had made quite significant progress.

Having sprayed the model with Citadel Zandri Dust. I started the detailing, using Leadbelcher on the weapons and the exhausts. The next step was painting the iconography and purity seals. For the skull I used Ushabti Bone.

I painted the purity seals using Ushabti Bone for the paper and for the wax seals I used Mephiston Red.

McDonnell Douglas Phantom FGR.2

At RAF London there is a is a McDonnell Douglas Phantom FGR.2.

The Phantom formed a major part of the Royal Air Force’s combat aircraft strength for over twenty years and provided the Service with one of the world’s most capable strike fighters.

Two versions of the Rolls Royce Spey-powered Phantom entered service with the Royal Air Force. The FG1 (the version also used by the Royal Navy) in the interceptor role and the FGR2 in the ground attack and tactical reconnaissance role in Germany. From 1977, all the Royal Air Force Phantoms were used exclusively as interceptor fighters over United Kingdom air-space.

Great Britain bought fifty two Phantom FG1s and 118 Phantom FGR2s.

Initially, the FGR.2 was used in the ground attack and reconnaissance role, primarily with RAF Germany. The superiority of the Phantom over the English Electric Lightning in terms of both range and weapon load, combined with the successful introduction of the SEPECAT Jaguar, meant that, during the mid-1970s, most of the ground attack Phantoms in Germany were redeployed to the UK to replace air defence Lightning squadrons.

With the deployment of Phantoms to the South Atlantic in 1982 an additional order for 15 Phantoms was placed. These were second hand United States Navy F-4Js fitted with General Electric F-79 engines. After an extensive refurbishment and the fitting of some British equipment they were designated F-4J(UK).

The collapse of the threat from the Eastern Europe led to an accelerated run down of the Phantom fleet and the last unit disbanded at the end of September 1992.

There is a McDonnell Douglas Phantom FGR.2 at the Imperial War Museum in Duxford.

Bristol Blenheim IV

The Bristol Blenheim is a British light bomber aircraft designed and built by the Bristol Aeroplane Company which was used extensively in the first two years of the Second World War, with examples still being used as trainers until the end of the war.

As the Allied Ground and Air Forces faced defeat in May 1940 the RAF had to use its light bomber force in desperate daylight raids against German army bridgeheads in France and the Low Countries. The Blenheim Ivs and Fairey Battles used in these attacks suffered crippling losses. In fact no higher loss, in operations of a similar size, has ever been suffered by the Royal Air Force.

The Blenheim IV, with its redesigned and longer nose, superseded the Blenheim I on the production lines in 1938. The original short nose Blenheim I had been developed from a civil aircraft and was one of the first new high performance monoplanes ordered under RAF Expansion Plans.

After the fighting in France was over Coastal and Bomber Command Blenheims began day and night attacks against German occupied ports and installations in frantic attempts to disrupt their invasion plans.

Blenheim IVs also served in North Africa and the Far East.

Undercoating the converted ruins

Back in April I got a Ruined Factorum sprue in  Warhammer 40000 Imperium issue 31. You get two corner ruins, all coming on a single sprue. Following that I got a couple of Ruined Factorum sprues that came with Warhammer 40000 Imperium issue 34.  You get another two corner ruins, all coming on a single sprue.

I did manage to pick up a second magazine and decided that I would convert them. It was a relatively simple conversion swapping over the corners. With the larger sides I needed to cut them down.

In issue 48 of Warhammer 40000 Imperium there was a re-release of the sprue from issue 31. With this repeat release of the sprue in issue 48, I decided I would use them for a conversion again. Unlike the other sprue from issue 34, this, one really isn’t suited to swapping corners. This is down to the differences in height. So, what I decided to do was to use the two different sprues from issues 34 and 48 and swap the corners. This would result in four different corner ruins from what I had already.

Having constructed the ruins I gave them a white undercoat, using a Corax White spray.

The first conversion I did took the largest pieces from each sprue. They fitted with no need to trim any of the ruins. I then used the larger floor pieces, which actually worked well together.

The other sides of these ruins go together as well.

This left the smaller corners.

The final corner ruin is quite small, using the smaller corner pieces.

The next stage will be a basecoat of grey paint.

 

Junkers Ju 87 Stuka

The Junkers Ju 87 or Stuka was a German dive bomber and ground-attack aircraft. It first flew in 1935 and in 1937 it was part of the Luftwaffe’s Condor Legion during the Spanish Civil War.

The Ju 87 operated with considerable success in close air support and anti-shipping roles at the outbreak of World War II. It led air assaults in the invasion of Poland in September 1939. Stukas proved critical to the rapid conquest of Norway, the Netherlands, Belgium and France in 1940. Though sturdy, accurate, and very effective against ground targets, the Stuka was, like many other dive bombers of the period, vulnerable to fighter aircraft. During the Battle of Britain of 1940-1941, its lack of manoeuvrability, speed and defensive armament meant that it required a heavy fighter escort to operate effectively.

The Junkers Ju 87 served throughout World War II and was also used post-war with some countries.

Ju 87 G-2, Werk Nr. 494083 is on display at RAF London. It was captured by British forces at Eggebek, Schleswig-Holstein in May 1945.

Buy the Airfix A07115 Junkers JU87B-2/R-2 Model.

Painting tracks

Having started repainting my Land Raider, a MkIIb Land Raider, the Razorback and the Repressor, I decided to paint the tracks. Having liked what I did with the Deimos-pattern Rhino tracks, I went with the same process.

I had done a few different things with the different tracks, but most had a black undercoat.

I gave the Land Raider tracks a spray of Mechanicus Standard Grey.

I did the same for the Rhino tracks.

The tracks for the Deimos-pattern Rhino are much better than the tracks you get with the Rhino kit.

The next step will be a heavy drybrush of Gorthor Brown, then a wash of Agrax Earthshade Shade. The tracks will be finished off with a light drybrush, first with Leadbelcher, then Terminatus Stone.

North American P-51D Mustang

The Mustang was undoubtedly one of the most versatile and successful single-seat fighters of World War Two. Originally designed to meet a British requirement early versions quickly demonstrated their superior performance and when later Mustangs were fitted with a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine the Allies had one of the truly great fighters of the 20th Century.

North American P-51D Mustang

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang is an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II and the Korean War, among other conflicts. The Mustang was designed in April 1940.

North American P-51D Mustang

The fitting of drop tanks allowed Mustangs to escort American bombers all the way to Berlin and back. The everyday appearance of such a superb Allied fighter over the German capital sounded the death knell of the Third Reich.

Buy the Airfix A05136 North American F51D Mustang Classic Kit.

Converting the Ruined Factorum sprues

Back in April I got a Ruined Factorum sprue in  Warhammer 40000 Imperium issue 31. You get two corner ruins, all coming on a single sprue.

Following that I got a couple of Ruined Factorum sprues that came with Warhammer 40000 Imperium issue 34.  You get another two corner ruins, all coming on a single sprue.

I did manage to pick up a second magazine and decided that I would convert them. It was a relatively simple conversion swapping over the corners. With the larger sides I needed to cut them down.

In issue 48 of Warhammer 40000 Imperium there was a re-release of the sprue from issue 31. With this repeat release of the sprue in issue 48, I decided I would use them for a conversion again. 

Unlike the other sprue from issue 34, this, one really isn’t suited to swapping corners. This is down to the differences in height. So, what I decided to do was to use the two different sprues from issues 34 and 48 and swap the corners. This would result in four different corner ruins from what I had already.

The first conversion I did took the largest pieces from each sprue. They fitted with no need to trim any of the ruins.

I then used the larger floor pieces, which actually worked well together.

This is quite a large piece of scenery.

The other sides of these ruins go together as well.

This left the smaller corners. They both required some trimming to fit.

The final corner ruin is quite small, using the smaller corner pieces.

The next stage will be a white undercoat.