Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

This model was the first one I bought for Tally Ho! It has been stuck in a box for about twenty years.. It was originally designed and manufactured by the Honourable Lead Boiler Suit Company (HLBSCo) they were small and relatively new.

The Rolls-Royce armoured car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used in World War I and in the early part of World War II.

This is a 1920s version of the Armoured Car. The model consists of a resin armoured hull, metal chassis, wheels, turrets and fiddly headlights. The model went together very easily, the parts were a good fit. I glued the armoured car hull to the chassis. The wheels and axels fitted very nicely into the respective holes.

Rolls Royce Armoured Car

I did check a few reference pictures to confirm that I had aligned the hull right and the spare wheels in the right place.

Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

The Rolls-Royce armoured car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used in World War I and in the early part of World War II.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

At the outbreak of World War II, 76 vehicles were in service. They were used in operations in the Western Desert, in Iraq, and in Syria. By the end of 1941, they were withdrawn from the frontline service as modern armoured car designs became available.

This model was the first one I bought for Tally Ho! It has been stuck in a box for about twenty years.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

It was originally designed and manufactured by the Honourable Lead Boiler Suit Company (HLBSCo) they were small and relatively new. I even remember discussing licensing the models for a commercial version of Tally Ho! However that didn’t go any further and the model went into a box.

A version of the model is still available today and the other HLBSCo models are available from Empress Miniatures. The newer version consists of more resin and less white metal.

As well as Tally Ho! I am also going to use it with Bolt Action with my Home Guard Unit, and possibly A Very British Civil War.

This is a 1920s version of the Armoured Car. The model consists of a resin armoured hull, metal chassis, wheels, turrets and fiddly headlights.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Despite the age of the model, this is a well crafted sculpture and has captured the rather unique look of the original.

Next stage will be putting it altogether, though the headlamps look rather fiddly.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

This model was the first one I bought for Tally Ho! It has been stuck in a box for about twenty years..

The model went together very easily, the parts were a good fit. I glued the armoured car hull to the chassis. The wheels and axels fitted very nicely into the respective holes.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

I did check a few reference pictures to confirm that I had aligned the hull right and the spare wheels in the right place.

Despite the age of the model, I am quite impressed with the quality of the castings and how easily it went together, having said that, I still need to glue the headlights into place.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

This model was the first one I bought for Tally Ho! It has been stuck in a box for about twenty years..

I can’t recall the manufacturer, but they were small and relatively new, I even remember discussing licensing the models for a commercial version of Tally Ho! However that didn’t go any further and the model went into a box…

As well as Tally Ho! I am also going to use it with Bolt Action with my Home Guard Unit, and possibly A Very British Civil War.

The Rolls-Royce armoured car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used in World War I and in the early part of World War II.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

At the outbreak of World War II, 76 vehicles were in service. They were used in operations in the Western Desert, in Iraq, and in Syria. By the end of 1941, they were withdrawn from the frontline service as modern armoured car designs became available.

This is a 1920s version of the Armoured Car. The model consists of a resin armoured hull, metal chassis, wheels, turrets and fiddly headlights.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Despite the age of the model, this is a well crafted sculpture and has captured the rather unique look of the original.

Next stage will be putting it altogether, though the headlamps look rather fiddly.

Capitain Craupaud – Darkest Africa

I have been sculpting the bases and painting some more Foundry miniatures from their Darkest Africa range that I am going to use with my Tally Ho! rules as well as Old West games.

Standing somewhat aloof, Capitain Craupaud holds his pistol ready for anything,

Capitain Craupaud

Still a fair of work to do.

Tally Ho! Workbench

I have been sculpting the bases and painting some more Foundry miniatures from their Darkest Africa range that I am going to use with my Tally Ho! rules as well as Old West games.

Teddy Roosevelt

For these models, I decided to use a bit of green stuff to texture the base. This will combined with the Citadel Texture make the base look more like a base and less like a coin.

Enfield

The Younger Stanley

Graf von Schnyder

Tally Ho! Mechanics

Tally Ho!

Tally Ho is a game idea that I started developing, probably nearly twenty years ago, but hasn’t come very far. The vision for the game is having small unit actions in the 1930s, normally using a small band of heroic adventurers versus nasty types.

I am aiming to use the blog to expand and explore upon the ideas behind the game and rules and then collate them before publishing them on the main website.

In terms of game mechanics, the main concept was less about realism, but much more about heroic actions in the style of film and television heroes.

Each figure in the game is an individual character and would be represented by a character card. The character would have characteristics that would allow them to carry out certain actions in the game.

Continue reading “Tally Ho! Mechanics”

Enfield – A League of Exceptional Gentleman

I had a pack of Darkest Africa miniatures from Foundry. I also intend to use them for VSF and Old West scenarios too, as well as Tally Ho! games. This is Enfield from the blister of A League of Exceptional Gentleman.

Enfield

Another nicely crafted model from The Foundry. The model was glued to a two pence piece and I gave the model a white undercoat. I decided to use a bit of green stuff to texture the base. This will combined with the Citadel Texture make the base look more like a base and less like a coin. In addition I added some Citadel slate as a rock for the base.

Enfield

Starting on painting the model with a light brown for the hat.

Malto Cortese – Tally Ho!

Having given him a white undercoat, I started painting the model.
Malto Cortese – Tally Ho!
Malto Cortese is a really nice sculptured model and quite different to the other miniatures in the A League of Exceptional Gentleman – DA012 range.
I think this will be a really useful model for Victorian Science Fiction scenarios, he looks like a Steam Tank or Ether Flyer Captain rather than a Darkest Africa explorer. His expression of determination really comes out in the model and he looks like an individual who you wouldn’t want to cross.