Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

This model was the first one I bought for Tally Ho! It has been stuck in a box for about twenty years..

The model went together very easily, the parts were a good fit. I glued the armoured car hull to the chassis. The wheels and axels fitted very nicely into the respective holes.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

I did check a few reference pictures to confirm that I had aligned the hull right and the spare wheels in the right place.

Despite the age of the model, I am quite impressed with the quality of the castings and how easily it went together, having said that, I still need to glue the headlights into place.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

This model was the first one I bought for Tally Ho! It has been stuck in a box for about twenty years..

I can’t recall the manufacturer, but they were small and relatively new, I even remember discussing licensing the models for a commercial version of Tally Ho! However that didn’t go any further and the model went into a box…

As well as Tally Ho! I am also going to use it with Bolt Action with my Home Guard Unit, and possibly A Very British Civil War.

The Rolls-Royce armoured car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used in World War I and in the early part of World War II.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

At the outbreak of World War II, 76 vehicles were in service. They were used in operations in the Western Desert, in Iraq, and in Syria. By the end of 1941, they were withdrawn from the frontline service as modern armoured car designs became available.

This is a 1920s version of the Armoured Car. The model consists of a resin armoured hull, metal chassis, wheels, turrets and fiddly headlights.

Tally Ho Rolls Royce Armoured Car

Despite the age of the model, this is a well crafted sculpture and has captured the rather unique look of the original.

Next stage will be putting it altogether, though the headlamps look rather fiddly.

Flames of War Rolls Royce Armoured Cars

The Rolls-Royce armoured car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used in World War I and in the early part of World War II.
Having undercoated my two Flames of War Rolls Royce Armoured Cars, I gave the models a basecoat of Warpaint British Armour.



See the workbench feature on the Rolls Royce Armoured Car.

Flames of War Rolls Royce Armoured Cars

The Rolls-Royce armoured car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used in World War I and in the early part of World War II.
There are two models in the blister. The model comprises (as with most Flames of War models) a resin body and metal components for the wheels. The turret is metal though.

The models went together very easily.


See the workbench feature on the Rolls Royce Armoured Car.

Flames of War Rolls Royce Armoured Cars


The Rolls-Royce armoured car was a British armoured car developed in 1914 and used in World War I and in the early part of World War II.
At the outbreak of World War II, 76 vehicles were in service. They were used in operations in the Western Desert, in Iraq, and in Syria. By the end of 1941, they were withdrawn from the frontline service as modern armoured car designs became available.
So there I was flicking through issue 286 of Wargames Illustrated when I noticed in the Hellfire and Back battle report a wonderful looking Rolls Royce Armoured Car.
I’ve always liked the Rolls Royce Armoured Car and though this is a desert version, wondering if it wouldn’t take much to convert it for Home Guard use. I would need to convert the turrets back from the open ones used in the desert to the older closed ones. Of course it would be nice if a non-desert version of the Rolls Royce Armoured Car was sold as part of Blitzkreig, but I am guessing it won’t be.
It was in 1940, that 34 vehicles which served in Egypt with the 11th Hussars regiment had the “old” turret replaced with an open-topped unit carrying a Boys anti-tank rifle, .303 inch Bren machine gun and smoke grenade launchers.
However I have decided to use them as part of my Early War Brits and not convert the turrets. As I am intending to explain away the open turret by assuming that the reasons the “old” turret was replaced in the desert would be applicable in to an invaded England, the need to replace the standard machine gun with an anti-tank weapon and a Bren gun. Well that;s my story and I am sticking to it. I might convert them at a later date anyhow.
There are two models in the blister.

The model comprises (as with most Flames of War models) a resin body and metal components for the wheels. The turret is metal though.

Lots of nice detail on the model.


See the workbench feature on the Rolls Royce Armoured Car.
 

Flames of War Rolls Royce Armoured Car


So there I was flicking through the most recent copy of Wargames Illustrated when I noticed in the Hellfire and Back battle report a wonderful looking Rolls Royce Armoured Car.

I believe that this is a new model for Flames of War and hasn’t been released before by Battlefront.

I’ve always liked the Rolls Royce Armoured Car and though this is a desert version, wondering if it wouldn’t take much to convert it for Home Guard use. I would need to convert the turrets back from the open ones used in the desert to the older closed ones. Of course it would be nice if a non-desert version of the Rolls Royce Armoured Car was sold as part of Blitzkreig, but I am guessing it won’t be.
I like the Morris CS9 model too.