FWD Model ‘B’ 4×4 truck

Imperial War Museum Duxford is a branch of the Imperial War Museum near Duxford in Cambridgeshire, and on a recent visit I was able to take a range of photographs of the aircraft and tanks on display.

In the Land Warfare Exhibit is a variety of vehicles and weapons from the Great War, including this FWD Model ‘B’ 4×4 truck.

FWD Model ‘B’ 4x4 truck

FWD was an American truck company. The FWD Model B was an American built four-wheel drive truck produced by the Four Wheel Drive Auto Company that saw widespread service with American and British forces during the First World War.

Artillery at Duxford

There are quite a few artillery pieces on display at the Imperial War Museum Duxford in their Land Warfare exhibit.

This is a German 7.7cm Field Gun from World War One.

The gun on the right is a British 18 pounder quick firing field gun. The one on the left an American M1917 75mm field gun, based on the British 18 pounder.

This is a German 21cm Heavy Howitzer or Mortar.

The 21 cm Mörser 10 (21 cm Mrs 10) was a heavy howitzer used by Germany in World War I (although classified as a mortar (Mörser) by the German military).

As well as the guns there was also a trench train. Well a British MM15 War Department Light Railways Motor Rail 40hp ‘Simplex’ Petrol Tractor to be precise.

For use on the two foot War Department Light Railway.

The War Department Light Railways were a system of narrow gauge trench railways run by the British War Department in World War I. Light railways made an important contribution to the Allied war effort in the First World War, and were used for the supply of ammunition and stores, the transport of troops and the evacuation of the wounded.

Soviet D-30 122mm Towed Howitzer

Outside the Land Warfare exhibit at the Imperial War Museum Duxford is a Soviet D-30 122mm Towed Howitzer.

Soviet D-30 122mm Towed Howitzer

The Soviet D-30 is a Soviet howitzer that first entered service in 1960 and it was adopted by other Warsaw Pact nations. . It is a robust piece that focuses on the essential features of a towed field gun suitable for all conditions. The D-30 has a maximum range of 15.4 kilometers, or over 21 km using RAP ammunition.

This example served with the Volksarmee of the DDR and was assimilated into the equipment of the German army on reunification.

Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier)

Outside the Land Warfare exhibit at the Imperial War Museum Duxford is an Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier).

This British tracked armoured personnel carrier has a crew of 2 with capacity for 10 personnel, powered by Rolls-Royce 6-cylinder multi-fuel engine, armed with one machine gun.

Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier)

The FV432 is the armoured personnel carrier variant of the British Army’s FV430 series of armoured fighting vehicles. Since its introduction in the 1960s, it has been the most common variant, being used for transporting infantry on the battlefield. In the 1980s, almost 2,500 vehicles were in use, with around 1,500 remaining in operation – mostly in supporting arms rather than front-line infantry service.

Although the FV432 Series was to have been phased out of service in favour of newer vehicles, such as the Warrior and the CVR(T) series, 500 have been upgraded to extend their service into the next decade.[1]

Alvis FV432 APC (Armoured Personnel Carrier)

This particular FV432 entered service December 1964 with the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders BAOR.

Airliners at Duxford

As well as military aircraft there are a fair few civilian aircraft on display as well.

BAC One Eleven 500

BAC One Eleven 500

Operated by BEA from 1969 until British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) and BEA merged to form British Airways in 1972. After retirement by British Airways it was donated to the society and flown to Duxford in 1993. Displayed in British Airways markings and named County of Dorset.

Hawker Siddeley Trident 2E

Hawker Siddeley Trident 2E

Painted in British European Airways markings to represent the first operator of the aircraft between 1968 and 1972. Used by Cyprus Airways until it suffered damage during the Turkish invasion of Cyprus and was abandoned at Nicosia airport. It was recovered by British Airways and repaired; and continued in service until 1982, when it was donated to the society and flown to Duxford.

Handley Page Dart Herald 201

Handley Page Dart Herald 201

Painted in Air UK markings, its last operator; it was donated and flown to Duxford in 1985

Handley Page Dart Herald 201

Bristol Britannia 312

Bristol Britannia 312

Had been operated by BOAC and British Eagle but retains the colours of the last operator Monarch Airlines. Donated to the society by Monarch Airlines and flown to Duxford in 1975.

Britten-Norman Trislander

Britten-Norman Trislander

The last Britten-Norman Trislander to be used by Aurigny, Guernsey’s airline.

Vickers Viscount 701

Vickers Viscount 701

Painted to represent a Viscount of British European Airways with the original name Sir John Franklin. Whiskey Foxtrot was the second production aircraft and was delivered to British European Airways in 1953. The last operator was Cambrian Airways and she was retired in 1971 and placed on display at Liverpool Airport with the Viscount Preservation Trust. Transferred to the Duxford Aviation Society and moved to Duxford by road in 1976.

Vickers Viscount 701

Airspeed Ambassador 2

Airspeed Ambassador 2

The only surviving Ambassador; operated by British European Airways (BEA) from 1952 to 1958, it was then used by the Royal Jordanian Air Force as a VIP aircraft. It was bought by Dan-Air in 1963 and operated until 1971 when it went on display at Lasham Airfield. Donated to the Duxford Aviation Society in 1986 and moved to Duxford still painted in Dan-Air markings.

Hawker Sea Fury

Imperial War Museum Duxford is a branch of the Imperial War Museum near Duxford in Cambridgeshire, and on a recent visit I was able to take a range of photographs of the aircraft and tanks on display.

On the airfield itself running its engine was a Hawker Sea Fury.

Hawker Sea Fury

I also managed to get some video too.

The Hawker Sea Fury was a British fighter aircraft. It was the last propeller-driven fighter to serve with the Royal Navy, and one of the fastest production single reciprocating engine aircraft ever built. The Sea Fury has many design similarities to Hawker’s preceding Tempest fighter, having originated from a requirement for a “Light Tempest Fighter”.

A34 Comet Tank

Guarding the entrance to the Imperial War Museum Duxford is an A34 Comet Tank.

A34 Comet Tank

Imperial War Museum Duxford is a branch of the Imperial War Museum near Duxford in Cambridgeshire, and on a recent visit I was able to take a range of photographs of the aircraft and tanks on display.

A34 Comet Tank

The Comet was was a British cruiser tank that first saw use near the end of the second world war. It was designed as an improvement on the earlier Cromwell tank, mounting the new 77 mm HV gun in a new lower profile and part-cast turret. This gun was effective against late-war German tanks, including the Panther at medium range, and the Tiger.

I do have some of the Flames of War plastic models, but they are currently still in their boxes.