OM Autocarretta 37

The OM Autocarretta 37 was an Italian WW2 4×4 4-wheel steer light artillery tractor designed for use over harsh terrain, capacity for driver and 1 passenger.

This was on display at the Imperial War Museum Duxford.

OM Autocarretta 37

The OM Autocarretta 37 entered service with the Italian Royal Army in 1938, they were widely used throughout the second world war, especially on the Russian front and in the Balkans

British BL 7.2 inch Howitzer on an US Long Tom gun carriage

British BL 7.2 inch Howitzer on an US Long Tom gun carriage in the Land War Exhibit at the Imperial War Museum Duxford.

British BL 7.2 inch Howitzer on an US Long Tom gun carriage

The BL 7.2-inch howitzer was a heavy artillery piece used by the British Army throughout the Second World War.

The usual gun tractor for the 7.2-inch howitzer in the early war years was the Scammell Pioneer, although this was never available in sufficient numbers and from late 1943 the Pioneer was supplemented by the Albion CX22S.

Morris Quad Tractor

The Morris Commercial C8 FAT (Field Artillery Tractor), commonly known as a Quad, is an artillery tractor used by the British and Commonwealth forces during the Second World War. It was used to tow field artillery pieces, such as the 25-pounder gun-howitzer, and anti-tank guns, such as the 17-pounder. Although its sloped sides suggest otherwise,the Quad was not armoured.

Morris Quad Tractor

British WW2 4×4 field artillery tractor, crew of 1 plus capacity for 5 gun crew, powered by Morris EH 4-cylinder petrol engine. Designed specifically to tow a 25pdr or 17pdr gun and crew into action. Also carried ammunition and towed an ammunition limber.

A Morris C8 Quad Artillery Tractor from Simon’s collection.

Morris C8 Quad Artillery Tractor

Morris C8 Quad Artillery Tractor

AEC Matador and 5.5″ Gun

I have written before about the influence of Matchbox and Airfix and the impact it has on the models I buy for gaming.

When I was young, before I started this wargaming lark, I use to make up plastic kits. In the main these were the pocket money kits I could buy from my local model shop and these were manufactured by Airfix and Matchbox. I recall preferring the Matchbox kits as they came with a piece of scenery.

…I have started to realise how much my knowledge of World War Two vehicles and armour has been skewed by making those plastic kits all those years ago. They have also influenced what models I am buying and which ones I like.

A similar thing can be said when it comes to looking around Museums and seeing vehicles and aircraft. So it’s no surprise when I saw the AEC Matador and 5.5″ Howtizer at the Land Warfare Exhibit at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, the first thing that came to mind, was the classic Airfix kit.

Airfix AEC Matador and 5.5"Howitzer

The Airfix model scene is from Europe, however the actual truck on display at Duxford is painted in desert colours.

The AEC Matador was a heavy 4×4 truck and medium artillery tractor built by the Associated Equipment Company for British and Commonwealth forces during the Second World War.

AEC Matador

This truck served on Malta with the Royal Malta Artillery during World War Two.

The BL 5.5 inch Gun was a British artillery gun introduced during the middle of the Second World War to equip medium batteries.

5.5"Howitzer

This example, a Mark III, served with 25 Field Artillery Battery, RA (V), Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire Yeomanry, being withdrawn in 1977 after the barrel had fired over 1500 rounds.

Valentine Infantry Tank Mk III

This Valentine Infantry Tank Mk III was on display in the Land Warfare Exhibit at the Imperial War Museum Duxford.

Valentine Infantry Tank Mk III

British WW2 infantry support tank, crew of 4, powered by AEC 6-cylinder diesel engine, armed with 2pdr gun and machine gun.

Valentine was an infantry tank produced in the United Kingdom during the Second World War. More than 8,000 of the type were produced in eleven marks, plus various specialised variants, accounting for approximately a quarter of wartime British tank production.

37mm Pak 36

Of all the anti-tank guns used during the Second World War, the 37mm Pak 36 was the most widely encountered. This one is displayed in the Land Warfare Exhibit at Duxford.

3.7 cm Pak 36

Developed in 1933 and issued to the German army in 1936, with 9,120 being available by the beginning of the war in September 1939 and a further 5,339 produced during the war.

A Pak 36 in Northern France, 1944
A Pak 36 in Northern France, 1944 – Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-299-1831-26 / Hähle, Johannes / CC-BY-SA 3.0

I remember having a 1:76th version (20mm) because I had the Matchbox Krupp Kfz 69.

Vickers Mk VIA Light Tank and Polish 3.7cm Bofors Anti-Tank Gun

The Vickers Mk VIA Light Tank was a British WW2 light tank, crew of 3, powered by Meadows 6-cylinder petrol engine, armed with two machine guns.

Vickers Mk VIA Light Tank

This one is on display at the Imperial War Museum Duxford. It was one of 11 sent to Australia in 1941 for training purposes Standard British light tank till 1941.

The Mk VI Light Tank was the sixth in the line of light tanks built by Vickers-Armstrongs for the British Army during the interwar period. The company had achieved a degree of standardization with their previous five models, and the Mark VI was identical in all but a few respects. The turret, which had been expanded in the Mk V to allow a three-man crew to operate the tank, was further expanded to give room in its rear for a wireless set.

The British Army lost 331 Mark VI light tanks in the Battle of France of 1940.

The Mk VIB was also used in the North African campaign against the Italians late in 1940 with the 7th Armoured Division.

Here are some 15mm Flames of War Light Tank VIs and a metal 15mm one of mine, which is badly painted.

In front of the tank is a Polish manufactured 3.7cm Bofors Anti-Tank Gun.

Polish 3.7cm Bofors Anti-Tank Gun

The 3.7 cm Bofors Cannon M/36P anti-rtank gun was a Swedish design that was developed in the mid-1930s, and was also manufacured in Finland. During the Second World war, it was used by Polish, Danish, and Finnish armies as well as the British. Captured examples were also used by the German Army, who designated it the 3.7 Panzerabwehrkanone 36(p) oder 157(d).

Behind the tank is a 1912 Italian – Fiat 15 ter 1.5 ton Light Truck.