Marmon-Herrington Mark VI Armoured Car

This Marmon-Herrington Mark VI Armoured Car was on display at Bovington Tank Museum.

Marmon-Herrington Mark VI Armoured Car
Marmon-Herrington Mark VI Armoured Car

The Marmon-Herrington Armoured Car was a series of armoured vehicles that were produced in South Africa and adopted by the British Army during the Second World War. RAF Armoured Car companies possessed them, but seem never to have used them in action.

The Mark VI was a return to the 8-wheeled design. Powered by two Mercury V8 engines with an eight-wheel drive steered on the front and rear wheels. Two prototypes were built, one with a 2 pounder and other with a 6 pounder gun in an open-topped three-man turret with electric powered traverse and protected by 10 to 30 mm of sloped armour. Additional armament consisted of 2 or 3 machine guns. The two-pounder equipped version was sent to the UK for assessment, the transmission proved unreliable suffering several axle failures. The 2-pdr is now in the Bovington Tank Museum, the other in South Africa.

Loyd Carrier MkII

The Loyd Carrier was one of a number of small tracked vehicles used by the British and Commonwealth forces in the Second World War to transport equipment and men about the battlefield. Alongside the Bren, Scout and Machine Gun Carriers, they also moved infantry support weapons.

This Loyd Carrier MkII was part of the Land Warfare Exhibit at Duxford.

Loyd Carrier MkII

British World War Two tracked armoured universal carrier, unarmed, crew of 1 with capacity for up to 8 personnel or similar load, powered by Ford 8-cylinder Vee petrol engine.

Albion CX22S Heavy Artillery Tractor

Albion CX22S Heavy Artillery Tractor

This is the Albion CX22 Heavy Artillery Tractor in the Land Warfare Exhibit at Duxford.

Albion CX22 Heavy Artillery Tractor

British WW2 6×4 heavy artillery tractor, crew of 1 and capacity for 6 gun crew with stowage for ammunition, powered by Albion EN244 6-cylinder diesel engine.

Albion CX22S Heavy Artillery Tractor

The Albion CX22S was designed and built by Albion Motors in late 1943 to supplement the Scammell Pioneer heavy artillery tractor, which was not available in sufficient numbers. In service the CX22S was used by the British Army to tow the 155mm Long Tom and the BL 7.2-inch howitzer.

 

M14/41 Medium Tank

The M 14/41 was a four-crew medium tank that served from 1941 in the Royal Italian Army.

M14/41 Medium Tank

This M14/41 Medium Tank was on display at the Tank Museum in Bovington.

Captured versions of the M14/41 Medium Tank were used by British and Australian troops in the desert.

I do like the Italian tanks for World War Two and have thought about building a 15mm force using them, along with the P40 Heavy Tank Mid-War Monster.

P40 Heavy Tank

V-1 flying bomb

This V-1 flying bomb was hanging from the ceiling of the Imperial War Museum in London.

V-1 flying bomb

The history of this particular V1 is not known but it was acquired by the Museum in 1946, and retains its original wartime paintwork.

The V-1 was the first of the so-called “Vengeance weapons” series (V-weapons or Vergeltungswaffen) deployed for the terror bombing of London. It was developed at Peenemünde Army Research Center in 1939 by the Nazi German Luftwaffe at the beginning of the Second World War.

V1 Flying Bomb
V1 FLYING BOMB (C 4431) A cut-away and annotated drawing of the Fiesler Fi 103 flying bomb, (also known as FZG 76 or V1 weapon). Copyright: © IWM. Original Source

The Wehrmacht first launched the V-1 to target London on 13 June 1944, one week after (and prompted by) the successful Allied landings in Europe.

T-34-85 Soviet Medium Tank

The T-34-85 was a Soviet WW2 medium tank, crew of 5, powered by 12-cylinder diesel engine, armed with 85mm gun and two machine guns.

T-34/85 Soviet Medium Tank

It went not be used well beyond the second world war in major conflicts across the world, and I still in service today.

The T-34, a Soviet medium tank, had a profound and lasting effect on the field of tank design. At its introduction in 1940, the T-34 possessed an unprecedented combination of firepower, mobility, protection and ruggedness. Its 76.2 mm (3 in) high-velocity tank gun provided a substantial increase in firepower over any of its contemporaries while its well-sloped armour was difficult to penetrate by most contemporary anti-tank weapons.

A project to develop a new tank following the introduction of improved German Panzer IVs with the high-velocity 75 mm gun, was started by the Soviet Union. The T-43 was  designed to have improved armour, better suspension and a bigger gun. However it was decided that manufacturing a new tank would cause a significant slow-down in production so it was cancelled.

However the T-43 turret was then modified to fit the T-34 and was armed with a new 85mm gun. The T-34-85 was a compromise between those in the Soviet Union who wanted to build as many 76mm armed T34s and those who wanted to build the new T-43 tank.

T-34-85 Soviet Medium Tank

The T-34-85 gave the Red Army a tank with better armour and mobility than the German Panzer IV tank and StuG III assault gun. While it could not match the armour or weapons of the heavier Panther and Tiger tanks, its improved firepower made it much more effective than earlier models.

The development of the T-34-85 led directly to the T-54 and T-55 series of tanks, which in turn evolved into the later T-62, T-72, and T-90 that form the armoured core of many modern armies.

This T-34-85 was on display at the Imperial War Museum in Duxford, and they even put Tank Riders on the back.

T-34/85 Soviet Medium Tank

Reading the Hot War books from Harry Turtledove has inspired me to think about gaming some scenarios from the books. British Comets and Centurions versus T34-85 and T54 Soviet tanks, along with American M26 Pershing and M48 Patton tanks. In the book there are also Sherman tanks manned by (West) German forces.

Carro Veloce L3/33

The Carro Veloce 33 or L3/33 was a tankette originally built in 1933 and used by the Italian Army before and during World War II. It was based on the imported British Carden Loyd tankette.

This Carro Veloce L3/33 was on display at the Bovington Tank Museum.

Carro Veloce L3/33

This is the flamethrower variant, which was captured in North Africa. It carried 500 litres of flame fuel in a special trailer (which you can see behind the tankette). The flame fuel was delivered by a pump, driven off the gearbox, which gave it a flaming range of about 35 metres. However crews were warned not to use the flamethrower when travelling at full speed (26mph) as they might set themselves alight.

There is no evidence that they were used in battle One of the things I find seeing these kinds of armoured vehicle in the “flesh” is how small they are. I am surprised anyone can sit in that let alone two  crew. It must be really cramped and having the flamer fuel pumped through the centre of the tankette, wouldn’t be surprised by the reluctance of these being used.

OM Autocarretta 37

The OM Autocarretta 37 was an Italian WW2 4×4 4-wheel steer light artillery tractor designed for use over harsh terrain, capacity for driver and 1 passenger.

This was on display at the Imperial War Museum Duxford.

OM Autocarretta 37

The OM Autocarretta 37 entered service with the Italian Royal Army in 1938, they were widely used throughout the second world war, especially on the Russian front and in the Balkans

A34 Comet Tank

Within the Tank Museum at Bovington is the A34 Comet Tank.

A34 Comet Tank

The Comet was was a British cruiser tank that first saw use near the end of the second world war. It was designed as an improvement on the earlier Cromwell tank, mounting the new 77 mm HV gun in a new lower profile and part-cast turret. This gun was effective against late-war German tanks, including the Panther at medium range, and the Tiger.

The Comet saw action in the closing stages of World War II and remained in British service until 1958, but was rapidly eclipsed by Centurion. In some cases, Comets sold to other countries continued to operate into the 1980s.

I do have some of the Flames of War plastic models, but they are still currently still in their boxes. I have been thinking of using them not only for Late War Flames of War games, but also 1950s Cold War games. The Comet remained in British service until 1958. Reading the Hot War books from Harry Turtledove has inspired me to think about gaming some scenarios from the books. British Comets and Centurions versus Russians T34-85 and T54 Soviet tanks with American M26 Pershing and M48 Patton tanks. In the book there are also Sherman manned by (West) German forces.

Why such a liking for this tank, well, as with other models, I suspect that it was because I bought and made the Matchbox Comet many, many years ago.