The Great War at GamesDay 2007

Thirteen years ago today the 23rd September , it was GamesDay 2007 and I saw one of the best display games ever at the show, well one of my favourites.

It was Dave Andrews’ Warhammer Historical Great War game.┬áThe game was full of wonderful details and well painted miniatures and excellent scenery. I spent ages looking at it.

Mk IV Tank Male slowly trundles forward crushing the barbed wire obstacles in its path.
Mk IV Tank Male slowly trundles forward crushing the barbed wire obstacles in its path.
It's a well painted tank, excellent weathering.
It’s a well painted tank, excellent weathering.
The remains of a previous battle litter the area, this tank will fight no more.
The remains of a previous battle litter the area, this tank will fight no more.
British Infantry advance through the ruins of a French village.
British Infantry advance through the ruins of a French village.

It’s the eye for detail which makes the scenery do well done, here the interior has not just been modelled, but ruined in a realistic manner as well. Continue reading “The Great War at GamesDay 2007”

Mark IV Tank with Fascine

At the Bovington Tank Museum you can get close up and personal with the first tanks that were built and used in combat, such as the Mark IV Tank.

First World War tanks, namely the British Mark IV, started the practice of carrying fascines on the roof, to be deployed to fill trenches that would otherwise be an obstacle to the tank.

Mark IV Tank with Fascine

The Mark IV was a British tank of the First World War. Introduced in 1917, it benefited from significant developments of the Mark I tank (the intervening designs being small batches used for training). The main improvements were in armour, the re-siting of the fuel tank and ease of transport. A total of 1,220 Mk IV were built: 420 “Males”, 595 “Females” and 205 Tank Tenders (unarmed vehicles used to carry supplies), which made it the most numerous British tank of the war.

The “Male” tanks were armed with three machine guns and two 6-pdrs. Whilst the “Female” tanks had Five .303 Lewis machine guns.

The Mark IV was first used in mid 1917 at the Battle of Messines Ridge. It remained in British service until the end of the war, and a small number served briefly with other combatants afterwards.

I have been working on a metal 15mm Mark IV Tank for use with the Home Guard.

Though I do really like the Flames of War Great War models, which have a lot more detail.

Mark IV Male

I also have a gallery of Mark IV tanks from a wonderful 28mm demonstration game at GamesDay 2007.

Mark IV Tank