Kill Bursta Tank

Forge World’s big Ork tank mounts a huge gun ready to take on any Imperial BaneBlade or even Titan.

The Kill Bursta mounts a huge-bore Kannon capable of destroying bunkers and siegeworks with ease.

As with the Kil Krusha you do get a lot of resin.

The tracks were quite warped, nothing that a little hot water wouldn’t fix. I really like the commander figure.

The first job was to wash the resin. I then taking the main chassis I added the wheels.

The tracks were quite warped, however by immersing them in hot water it was straightforward to fix them to the suspension.

Unlike the Kil Krusha or the Big Trakk the tracks for the kill bursta were much easier to fit.

I do like the look of this model, the ramshackle thrown together look.

It does go well together.

The main engine is suitably Orky.

The front and rear hull was added to the model.

The parts fitted quite well.

The next stage was adding the superstructure. This didn’t quite fit as well as I thought it should.

There were a fair few gaps. However with a model such as this, the gaps were less obvious than would be on an Imperial model.

After fitting the sides, the Doza Blade was added.

The top of the superstructure and the side turrets were added.

The engine was added to the rear.

The main armament was added to the front. This was another piece that I thought didn’t fit too well.

After completing the model, I gave it a white undercoat.

The model was sprayed top and bottom.

Another view. This is one impressive tank.

The next stage was the black undercoat, so using masking tape I covered the majority of the model.

The model was then sprayed black. Slight issue was that the black matte spray I was using came out slightly glossy!

I then removed the masking tape. As you can see there is some bleed, but the white undercoat will ensure that the basecoat will cover fine.

Using a thinned Chaos Black I touched up the black basecoat. I also black undercoated certain parts of the engine.

Digging the model out from storage, I decided not that I would start again, but I certainly would have a different approach.

Usually with my Ork vehicles I would use a heavy drybrush of Tin Bitz over black. However I starting with my Grot Tanks, I wanted to get a different look and feel to the metal parts, and especially the tracks, a more rusty and dusty feel to the model. This is similar to the Forge World version of the tank.

So the first thing I did was something different and sprayed the upper surfaces of the model with Citadel Spray Zandri Dust. I didn’t mask the model, but the black paint will add shadow.

This is the first time I have used the new (for me) Citadel Sprays and was impressed with the pressure, coverage and colour. I like how it matches the pot colour as well.

I then started painting the tracks and most of the wheels with Gorthor Brown. What I really wanted to get was a rusty look to the tracks. Usually with my Ork vehicles I would use a heavy drybrush of Tin Bitz over black. However I starting with my Grot Tanks, I wanted to get a different look and feel to the tracks, rusty and dusty. I think the Gorthor Brown will be a good base for the tracks.

What I did notice though was that in storage a rear exhaust and a flamer had broken off. I did manage to find them and glue them back on to the model.

I painted the rear engine with Leadbelcher. I also painted the small turret weapons with Leadbelcher as well.

This covered the basecoat rather well, and the black undercut added shadow.

I started painting some of the panels with other colours, notably Balor Brown and Ushabti Bone. This is really to break up the predominant colour of the model. However I didn’t do too many, as I didn’t want a patchwork effect.

The next stage was a bit of a challenge in using various Citadel shades, though mainly Seraphim Sepia to add shadow to the model.

I did use a large 1/2 Round Mop brush which helped.